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Atchison County

4-H Projects

4-H projects are tools for teaching young people life skills by developing their interests in certain areas. This is done through completing the following steps: 1) setting goals for learning, leadership, and citizenship, 2) planning and carrying out goals; 3)  reflecting on experiences, and 4) keeping records about each project area.  Upon completion of these 4 steps, the 4-H project is said to be complete. It is possible to complete a 4-H project without a fair exhibit. Exhibiting at fair without completing the steps above does not represent the goals of the 4-H program.

4-H project enrollment assists youth to value and practice service to others.  In 4-H we pledge our hands to larger service. In Kansas 4-H we say one of our life skills is developing a concern for the community. One of the eight essential Elements of 4-H is the Opportunity to value and practice service to others.

• Youth need to feel their lives have meaning and purpose.

• By participating in 4-H community service and citizenship activities, youth connect to communities and learn to give back to others.

One of the “big four” (BMIGS) is Generosity – Community Service is a major contributor to meeting this. In the book, The Good Teen (Based on the national multi-year  4-H  study by Dr. Richard Lerner) the author talks about the Concern for Community and that 4-H develops this better than other youth development programs. The Positive Youth Development C’s, (five + one) are  Competence, Confidence, Connection, Character, Caring, plus Contribution. 4-H Community Service strengthens all six of the C’s.  Older teens are asked to provide leadership in their project work as it contributes towards supporting positive youth development skill development cited above.  On individual project pages,  we have tried to share potential community service and leadership examples to serve as idea starters. 

The Danish system of judging is used in the 4-H judging process; the youth’s exhibit is compared against a project standard. The purpose of the judging experience is to provide feedback regarding project skill mastery. All 4-H exhibits start at the red ribbon level. A red ribbon signifies that the project is average for the 4-Her’s age and skill level. There should be no shame in receiving a red ribbon; rather in the 4-H world, it means that the 4-Her is learning new skills and simply needs additional time and practice to master the new skill being learned. Simply entering an exhibit with the single goal of  receiving a purple ribbon, that does not require learning new skills or demonstrate achieving skill mastery from the previous years, is not practicing the 4-H motto “To Make The Best, Better.” Some youth and their parents who prefer to focus only on competition rather than life skill development may be better served by other youth programs. The true purpose of a 4-H exhibit is to provide a representation of project work during the entire 4-H year.

AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCESANIMAL SCIENCES
Entomology         Score CardBeef/Bucket CalfDairy Cattle
Horticulture     Dairy GoatsDog Care & Training
Plant Science       
HorseMeat Goats
Shooting SportsPetsPoultry
WildlifeRabbitsSheep
    All Project Judging SheetsSwineAnimal Science Anywhere
 
CREATIVE ARTSFAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES
Performing ArtsClothing & TextilesFood & Nutrition
PhotographyFiber Arts 
Home Environment
Visual ArtsHealth & WellnessPlace Setting
 Family Studies 
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENTSCIENCE, ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY
CitizenshipEnergy Management
CommunicationsEnvironmental Science
Exploring 4-HGeology
LeadershipSpace Technology
ReadingWoodworking
Self-Determined Dept H- fair rules and classes

 Stay at Home Projects

Discovering 4-H (B)Sew Fun (B)My Favorite Things (B)
Discovering 4-HSew FunMy Favorite Things

ABOUT 4-H This project book is for young first-year members and others who want to explore the broad array of topics offered by 4-H. Any member in need of an easy-to-read, easy-to-use introduction to animals, health, food and nutrition, nature, insects, plants and soils, machines and tools, recreation, and clothing benefits from doing this project, which is easily completed in one year.

CLOTHING AND TEXTILE SCIENCE This project will have you sewing in no time! Members of any age learn basic sewing skills with an easy introductory project --fully elastic-waisted skirt, shorts, pants, or capris. This project can be repeated, but good next projects are sundresses and jumpers.CREATIVE AND LEISURE ARTS/COLLECTING Are you interested in creating a personal collection? Want to take a collection you already have to the next level? Learn about various types of collections, the ins and outs of the collecting process, and how to best display your items. For members of all ages.
The Writer in You (I)Get Started in Art (A)Family History Treasure Hunt (A)
The Writer in YouGet Started in ArtTreasure Hunt
CREATIVE AND LEISURE ARTS/WRITING Find the motivation you need to start or continue your exploration of the art of writing. Explore why to write, where to write, where to get ideas, theme, character, plot and setting, word choice, imagery and dialogue. Keep it all in one place to create a portfolio each year.CREATIVE ARTS/FINE ARTS Explore the basic elements of visual art through activities on color, line, space, balance, and more, and then complete your own work of art. Ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, and crafts are all possibilities. Appropriate for members of all ages.CREATIVE ARTS/GENEALOGY This project book guides you through 6 years of activities! Discover your family history as you go on a treasure hunt for jewels of information such as interesting relatives, special events, and curious stories. The records you create will last a lifetime.
 Let's Start Cooking (B) Yeast Breads on the Rise (A) Racing the Clock to Awesome Meals (I)
 Lets Start Cooking Yeast Breads on the Rise Racing the Clock
FOOD AND NUTRITION This project takes a fresh look at basic baking skills. You'll learn about kitchen equipment and food prep, and how to read recipes and measure ingredients. Then you'll tackle how to slice and dice food, and how to cook in a microwave oven, on the stove, and in a conventional oven--all while keeping safety in mind.FOOD AND NUTRITION  Master the art of baking delicious yeast breads. Learn the principles of yeast bread preparation, and learn how mixing techniques determine product character and quality.FOOD AND NUTRITION  With a focus on the knowledge and skills needed to prepare quick, nutritious, low-cost meals, this project builds on basic food preparation skills so you can tackle difficult recipes while being creative with ingredients. The 7 activities and related recipes can easily be completed in one year.
Your Thoughts
Matter (A)
The Laundry Project (B)It's My Home (B)
Your Thoughts MatterThe Laundry ProjectIts My Home
HEALTHY LIVING What does mental health mean? How many people are affected by mental health issues such as anxiety and depression? Be part of the solution by learning the answers to those questions and more. Intended for advanced-level youth who are interested in learning more about mental health, why it is important to overall well-being, and steps that promote understanding and action. This project is not intended as a resource in crisis. If you or someone you know is struggling with a mental health issue, please seek adult or professional help immediately.HOME LIVING Everyone loves clean laundry but how do you do it? Learn about laundry machines and products, how to be environmentally friendly in the laundry room, and how to sort and clean laundry items. Experiment how heat affects different types of fibers too! For members of all ages with no experience in doing laundry.

HOME LIVING You can be a big contributor to your household kn so many ways. Why not do so AND keep your own sense of style? This project covers basic design elements, organization, upcycling, and service learning. All the activities can be done with your excellent decision making, good taste,and big heart.

Ohio Birds (X)Science Fun with Kitchen Chemistry (B)Not Just knots (X)
Ohio BirdsKitchen ChemistryNot Just Knots
NATURAL RESOURCES/THE NATURAL WORLD Observe and identify birds with bird feeders in your yard and on field trips to see the many benefits our feathered friends provide. This project book intended to be used for two years.STEM/CHEMISTRY Join the Terrestrial Alien Defense Academy and figure out how to outsmart the aliens by doing experiments in your kitchen. Learn about what matter is and how it changes form; explore the different properties of matter; find out about acids and bases; and discover hoe everyday items and kitchen ingredients can be used in cool tests.STEM/KNOTS Learn to make 14 different simple knots, bends, and hitches. Remember what they say--practice, practice, practice! Then show what you have learned with a capstone project of your choosing. Sample capstone projects are available at ohio4h.org/knots
Horseless Horse (B)Science Fun with Physics (B)
Horseless HorseScience Fun with Physics
ANIMAL SCIENCES/HORSES Learn about horses without owing one. Over 20 different subjects are covered in easy-to-use worksheets. Written for the beginner but suitable for members of all ages.STEM/PHYSICS Let your inner scientist uncover the mysteries of physics at play in daily life. The amazing magician Franco Newtoni is your guide as you try each experiment. You'll see the forces of nature, energy, and the power of physics at work--or is it magic?


PROJECT SKILL LEVEL

Projects above are listed by code, title, and skill level. Skill levels for projects are defined as follows:
All Levels (X)—A project appropriate for all skill and age levels.
Beginning (B)—A beginning-level project for members with little or no experience in a project area, or 8 to 10 year olds.
Intermediate (I)—An intermediate-level project for members with some experience in a project area, or 11 to 13 year olds. 
Advanced (A)—An advanced-level project for members with a lot of experience in a project area, or 14 or older. County fairs and the state fair often have age requirements that are different than those for project enrollment. When participating in a fair event, be sure to review the related guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michigan 4-H Project Snapshot Sheets

March 2, 2015

''4-H projects provide youth with the opportunity to build life skills that may be applied to future career choices. The 4-H snapshot sheet series covers what 4-H’ers can learn from projects, ways to get involved and resources for learning more. (2 pages per sheet, 2011-2018)

 

 

 

Projects

 

HOW DO I CHOOSE A PROJECT AND HOW MANY PROJECTS CAN I TAKE?

There are so many projects offered, it can be hard to narrow down your selections. As you choose projects, consider how much time you have to devote to project work. It’s better to do a few projects really well than choose a lot and not have time to complete them. Also keep in mind that to truly master a project it may take you more than a year. You may enroll in the same project multiple years. Consider enrolling in projects you are familiar with as well as exploring projects that are new to you. When choosing projects, a general guideline for members who are 8-10 years of age is to be involved in about three projects. Those who are 11 and older could choose 3-6 projects. Every young person is different, so work with your club leader and county 4-H staff to find the projects that are the best fit for you and the number of projects that are a good fit for you and your family.

how do i choose a project
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PROJECT BRIEFS: Many of the projects have project briefs available for free download. Project briefs are two-page overviews of a project to supplement project curriculum; they include activity and community service ideas, objectives, fair project ideas, and project resources. Project briefs are available with the other curriculum resources on the project web pages.

WANT TO TAKE A CERTAIN PROJECT, BUT THERE ISN’T A LEADER. WHAT DO I DO?

Project offerings are dependent on finding volunteer leaders. If a project isn’t offered in your club, check to see if it is offered on the county level or regional/state level through 4-H on Canvas. If a project leader isn’t easily found, often family members become the leader. Project materials are available for most projects. They are easy to read, explain the project, and offer suggestions on project meetings, exhibits and more.

WHERE DO I FIND PROJECT CURRICULUM?

Each project listed in the Clover has curriculum that aligns with learning and advancement in Missouri 4-H projects. You will find the curriculum and suggested resources for all levels of the projects on our website, here. Links on the website will take you to either purchase the curriculum or download the resource. You will also find resources in our new Canvas platform. Please see pg. 8 for details. 

HOW MANY PROJECT MEETINGS DO I NEED TO ATTEND?

A minimum of six hours of learning or instruction is the goal. As a general guideline, project leaders should have a plan in case of scheduling conflicts to help youth meet their required hours. Each meeting should be 1 to 1 ½ hours long.

HOW DO I SHOW WHAT I’VE LEARNED THROUGH MY 4-H EXPERIENCE?

Exhibiting 4-H project items is one way for young people to show what they have learned and accomplished. County fairs, achievement days, festivals and the Missouri State Fair provide places for 4-H members to showcase their work.

Below are a few guidelines for 4-H exhibits:

exhibits should
Exhibits should be 4-H member’s own work.
exhibits should demonstrate
Exhibits should demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained by the 4-H member for the specific project in which they are enrolled.
exhibits should be made
Exhibits should be made or completed in the current program year.

WHAT IF I HAVE AN ANIMAL PROJECT?

Some 4-H members will own or manage an animal for a 4-H project. For many of these projects, there are special requirements for competition, including deadlines for owning or managing the animal. Consult your local 4-H faculty for current deadlines. In addition, local fair boards or other partners might establish guidelines for participation. One of the objectives in owning an animal is to learn new skills in animal breeding, feeding, management and health. To accomplish this, the member should secure the animal as early in the year as possible. Livestock shows and exhibitions set up minimum dates for length of ownership necessary for exhibiting. For the Missouri State Fair, the dates are listed in the chart below.

what if i have
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PROJECT RECORD KEEPING

The 4-H Project Record should be used with all 4-H projects. The purpose of the  4-H Project Record form is to give you a tool to record information about your learning experience in each project. This record sheet is for you and your project leader to use to set goals, keep records of your work, expenses, community involvement, leadership and more. Ask any high school senior filling out scholarship forms how helpful 4-H record keeping is, and they will tell you how much work it saved them! Good record keeping will help you when applying for recognition and scholarships throughout your 4-H involvement.

4-H LEVELS

In an effort to simplify 4-H projects, we have implemented a level system. Most projects have three levels, Novice, Intermediate, and Advanced. Each level has descriptions stating what should be learned before moving up a level. Some projects do not have levels, for example Bucket Calves and Butterfly Wings. These projects are simple exploratory projects that are not meant to be taken for multiple years. The advancement program is designed so a 4-H member may advance as fast as he or she desires based on interest, effort and ability. A fourth- or fifth-grade 4-H member may take two or three years to complete a level, while an eighth- or ninth-grade member may complete one or two steps in a year. It is also possible that an older youth may not begin at the novice level. For instance, if an older youth already knows the basics of photography, they might start in Intermediate instead of Novice. Please work with your leaders to determine which level best fits you.

SELF-DETERMINED PROJECTS

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. Members enrolling in the self-determined project are responsible for identifying their project resources, filling out the Y951 form and consulting with their county 4-H staff person. 4-H staff will be able to add the project to the 4-HOnline enrollment system, once approved.

Self-determined (Citizenship, Leadership and Communication) (SD950)

  • Civic Engagement
  • Community/Volunteer Service
  • Leadership & Personal Development
  • Communications & Expressive Arts

Self-determined (Science) (SD952)

  • Biological Sciences
  • Technology and Engineering
  • Physical Sciences, Environmental Education/Earth

Sciences

  • Ag in the Classroom
  • Animals
  • Plant Science

Self-determined (Healthy Living) (SD951)

  • Foods and Nutrition
  • Health
  • Personal Safety

GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES (LO) PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS

Group learning opportunities are activities specifically designed for groups of 10 or more young people, in classrooms, clubs, camps and after-school programs. All of the activities are labeled with an "LO" and can be found in the Learning opportunities section on page 41.

Clover Kidsclover kids

The 4-H Clover Kids Program is designed to introduce 5- to 7-year-olds to a variety of 4-H experiences. 4-H Clover Kids are involved in activities led by an adult that will help them learn how to get along and share with others, explore many different interests, build self-confidence, learn to communicate effectively and learn how to be part of a group. The ultimate goal is to make this age group so excited about 4-H that they will continue their enrollment beyond the 4-H Clover Kids experience.

The adult to child ratio for these clubs is five to eight children per adult leader. Weekly meetings are recommended. Clover Kids do not participate in competitive events, contests or shows. 4-H Clover Kids do not raise project animals (such as those listed in the Plant & Animal Science section) or enroll in projects other than CK481, CK482, or CK483.

Since Clover Kids are not eligible for most of our other recognition programs, we offer Clover Kids pins at no cost. For details visit 4h.missouri.edu.

CK481 4-H Clover Kids 1

  • Membership Pins–White (Y4815)

CK482 4-H Clover Kids 2

  • Membership Pins–Black (Y4816)

CK483 4-H Clover Kids 3

  • Membership Pins–Red (Y4817)
approved small animals
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4-H CLOVER KIDS SMALL ANIMAL POLICY

4-H Clover Kids are encouraged to experience a wide range of activities. Learning about and enjoying small animals is one of the many opportunities children can have in a 4-H Clover Kids program. 4-H Youth Development programs developed the following list of approved small animals and policies to help ensure that children and volunteers have safe and meaningful experiences with these animals.

EXPLORING 4-Hexploring 4-h

EXPLORING 4-H (EX)

Discover your interests, potential 4-H projects and find out more about where you live. For first-year members only, ages 8-10. Exploring 4-H does not include exhibition of project animals or Shooting Sports. To participate in these areas, members should enroll in the appropriate animal project.

Exploring the Treasures of 4-H (EX261)

  • Explore 4-H activities
  • Identify your interests
  • Explore your family, friends, and community

 

Engineering & Technology

AEROSPACE | COMPUTERS & PROGRAMMING | ELECTRICITY | ENERGY | GEOSPACIAL ROBOTICS | SMALL ENGINES | WELDING | WOODWORKING

 

engineering and technology
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AEROSPACE (AS)aerospace

Think about the excitement that accompanies traveling to and exploring space. In the aerospace projects, you will learn more about aircrafts, rocketry and space through handson experiences and group interaction.

Aerospace 1 Novice (AS811)

  • Identify different types of aircraft
  • Learn how weather affects flying

Aerospace 2 Intermediate (AS812)

  • Explore space
  • Learn the forces that act on a rocket and experiment with roll, pitch and yaw

Aerospace 3 Advanced (AS813)

(previously Aerospace 3 & 4)

  • Learn to fly an airplane and pilot certification requirements
  • Use your investigation skills to discover the principles of flight, rocketry and astronomy
  • Learn Use engineering principles to design your own air and spacecrafts

COMPUTERS & PROGRAMMING (CP)computers and programming

Learn computer programming by creating your own games and fun animations. Use a programming environment to create your computer masterpiece.

Scratch Programming 1 (CP895)

Recommended for grades 3-12.

  • Learn basics of computer programming
  • Create programs using the Scratch environment
  • Add control and mix graphics, animations, music and sound to your programs
  • To get started, visit http://scratch.mit.edu/ for guides and an account.

Alice (CP896)

Recommended for grades 6-12.

Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web.

  • Learn object oriented programming
  • Create animated movies and simple video games
  • Populate a virtual world within Alice and create a program to animate the objects

To get started, visit http://alice.org/ for guides and software download.

Other Programming Languages or Computer Programs (CP897)

Computer science is a growing field and youth can become creative and innovative on their own.

  • Consider programming and creating/building a technology with Raspberry Pi, Ardunio, or micro:bits
  • Go deeper with other resources such as Code Academy and Khan Academy which can supplement learning in this area
  • Learn Python coding
  • Discuss with your 4-H staff a self-determined project in this area (requires a downloadable Selfdetermined Project form).

ELECTRICITY (EL)electricity

De-mystify the "magic" of electric circuits, magnetism, motors and electronics. From building burglar alarms to learning how to select a really good stereo and other consumer items, this project offers opportunities for hands-on experiences and knowledge you will use in the future. Experience technology firsthand while learning communication and decision-making skills.

Electricity 1 Novice (EL831)

Target audience: Grades 4-5

  • Insulation as it relates to electricity
  • How to build a flashlight, compass, electromagnet and electric motor

Electricity 2 Intermediate (EL832)

Target audience: Grades 6-7

  • Build circuits and test voltages
  • Build a rocket launcher
  • Build a burglar alarm

Electricity 3 Advanced (EL833)

(previously Electricity 3 & 4)

Target audience: Grades 8-12

  • Learn to measure electrical usage and to determine electrical loads
  • Learn to replace electrical switches
  • Evaluate light bulbs and test for electrical power
  • Learn the basics of solid-state electronics
  • Understand modern day electronic equipment through hands-on activities for practical experience. This unit is for the intermediate to advanced learner.

ENERGY (EG)energy

Whether it’s your community, home, family car or iPod; energy makes things happen. You will likely experience dramatic changes related to energy during your lifetime, so understanding the fundamental concepts of energy is important. You will gain knowledge and skills to understand energy development and use, and the impact on future careers.

Find diverse energy activities, resources and curriculum for exploration from the National Energy Education Department (NEED) Project at http://www.need.org.

Power of the Wind (EG861)

Target Audience: Grades 6-7

  • Explore the wind energy resources in your state and local communities
  • Gain a deeper understanding of the science, engineering and technology behind wind energy production
  • Create service-learning opportunities that help your community make sense of this new frontier.

GEOSPACIAL (GS)geospacial

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are hot technologies. Put yourself on the map by learning how to use these systems.

Geospatial 1 Novice (GS991)

  • Where in the world are you? Young people are introduced to new ways of thinking about geographic positions
  • Introduction to navigational tools (GPS, compasses, maps and globes) identifying locations, measuring distances and more
  • Learn to use GPS technology for multiple purposes

Geospatial 2 Intermediate (GS992)

  • Future map-makers will learn how to collect data, combine the data with geographical positions and then make your own maps.
  • Can data and maps solve problems? Get outside and do field studies and make maps about things you know or want to learn more about.

Geospatial 3 Advanced (GS993)

  • Advanced users will understand the basics of Remote Sensing Science through the curriculum
  • This project also enables self-determined exploration of emerging technologies such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) and unmanned aerial systems (UAS’s) also known as "drones" for humanitarian, agricultural, natural resources and more.

ROBOTICS (RO)robotics

Exploring 4-H Robotics is an ideal way to introduce science, math, engineering and technology while teaching life skills. Through handson activities, the 4-H Robotics projects teach basic concepts related to robotic subsystems such as structure, power, sensors, control and programming. These concepts are the foundation for building robots and robotic subsystems from a variety of materials and packaged kits. 4-H Robotics has projects and resources for a wide variety of interests.

JUNK DRAWER ROBOTICS

In each module of this project, you will learn about a different aspect of robotics, and design and build a robot. You will use your Robotics Youth Notebook to record your learning experiences, robotic designs and the data from your investigations. The Junk Drawer Robotics project has material kits available from the 4-H Mall.

Junk Drawer Robots 1 Novice (RO881)

  • Explore the design and function of robotic arms, hands and grippers
  • Build a robotic arm that really moves

Junk Drawer Robots 2 Intermediate (RO882)

  • Design and build machines that roll, slide, draw or move underwater
  • Explore robot mobility — movement, power transfer and locomotion

Junk Drawer Robots 3 Advanced (RO883)

  • Learn about the connection between the mechanical and electronic elements of robots
  • Explore sensors, write programs, build circuits and design your own robot

Robotics 1: With EV3 (RO884)

  • Use the newest LEGO® technology to learn about what a robot is
  • Explore robot mobility — movement, power transfer and locomotion
  • Learn to build and program the LEGO® Mindstorm EV3

Robotics 2: EV3N More (RO885)

  • Learn advanced robot configurations
  • Take on programming challenges with activities in the book and instructional videos.

Additional Robotics Platforms (RO886)

Do you want to learn about robots with other commercial educational robotic kits, electronics and engineering sets? There are several platforms available to help young people learn more in a hands-on, self-directed way.

Listed below are some of the more common platforms that can be used in this project, but don’t let that restrict your exploration of robotics. Each suggestion below has projects, online learning communities and lessons easily accessible from the product’s website. They may also have a connection to one of the Youth Robotics Competition Partners. This list is of common applications for 4-H Robotics and is not an endorsement of any one product.

  • Raspberry Pi: a low-cost, high-performance computer used to learn, solve problems and have fun. It is compatible with other platforms used in youth robotics.
  • VEX: VEX IQ, VEX EDR and VEX Pro are robot kits for different skill levels.
  • Tetrix: This platform the preferred building system for two different national competitions. Tetrix Prime is recommended for ages 12+; Tetrix Max is for teens age 14+.
  • SeaPerch: an underwater robotics program that builds a remotely operated vehicle from a kit comprised of low-cost, easily accessible parts with lessons on marine engineering themes.
  • Arduino: an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for anyone making interactive projects.

Youth Robotics Competition Partners (RO887)

4-H is a partner with several youth robotics organizations for competitive opportunities for 4-H’ers. Each of the youth robotics competition organizations listed below recognize 4-H as a pathway to participation. 4-H robotics members and groups are encouraged to get involved in these competitions. This project is for groups who join and participate in the competitions they offer. Please visit each partnering organization for specific challenges, registration and competition dates. Some organizations offer grants and incentives for joining.

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)self-determined

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Science) (SD952)

  • Biological Sciences
  • Technology and Engineering
  • Physical Sciences, Environmental Education/Earth Sciences
  • Ag in the Classroom
  • Animals
  • Plant Science

SMALL ENGINES (SE)small engines

Lawn mowers, snow blowers, personal water craft, go carts, model airplanes and ATVs are just a few of the hundreds of machines around us every day that are powered by small gas engines. In this project you will have hands-on experiences that will help you understand how small engines work and how to keep them working.

Small Engines 1 Novice (SE851)

  • Discover tools of the trade and how small engines work
  • Explore uses of small engines and safety issues

Small Engines 2 Intermediate (SE852)

  • Learn about engine sizes, compression rations and safety issues
  • Learn about occupations and starting your own business

Small Engines 3 Advanced (SE853)

  • Tear down and rebuild an engine
  • Use diagnostic tools

WELDING (WE)welding

Ever wonder how some things are held together? From cars to buildings to many other items, welding has made it possible. In this project you will learn simple welding skills such as how to identify welding equipment, strike an arc and run a bead.

Welding (WE846)

  • Learn how to build, modify or repair steel-based projects
  • Topics include safety, selection of equipment and materials and fabricating techniques with shielded metal arc welding

WOODWORKING (WO)woodworking

Have you ever wanted to make something with wood? This project is an opportunity for you to create and construct items using wood and woodworking tools. From the basics of using a tape measure and a hammer to advanced equipment like routers and table saws, there’s something for everyone. Have fun by learning new things and creating useful items.

Woodworking 1 Novice (WO871)

  • Develop skills such as measuring, squaring and cutting a board, driving nails, and using clamps and screws
  • Learn safety rules, tool safety settings and how to use safety gear

Woodworking 2 Intermediate (WO872)

  • Measure, cut, sand, drill, and use advanced hand and power tools
  • Learn the importance of proper sanding and finish application

Woodworking 3 Advanced (WO873)

(previously Woodworking 3 & 4)

  • Practice measuring angles, cutting dado and rabbet joints
  • Use a circular saw, a table saw and a radial arm saw
  • Use router, portable planer and a jointer
  • Make blind mortise, tenon joint and dovetail joints

 

 

Environmental Science & Natural Resources

AMPHIBIANS & REPTILES | BEEKEEPING | ENTOMOLOGY | EXPLORING THE ENVIRONMENT | FORESTRY OUTDOOR | SOIL & WATER SCIENCE | WEATHER & CLIMATE | SPORTFISHING | WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

 

environmental science
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AMPHIBIANS & REPTILES (AR)amphibians and reptiles

Do you know the difference between reptiles and amphibians? Can you name and identify the venomous snakes of Missouri? In these projects, you’ll step outside into the natural world, become an amateur herpetologist and discover interesting facts about amphibians and reptiles.

Amphibians and Reptiles (AR611)

  • Learn how some toads and frogs can vocalize underwater
  • Identify the three different types of habitats Missouri lizards live in
  • Distinguish between a venomous and nonvenomous snake

ENTOMOLOGY (EN)entomology

Explore the amazing world of insects and their fellow arthropod relatives. Learn the differences between bugs and insects, explore bee husbandry, and identify the stages of insect life cycles. Create an entomology box so that others can learn about insects as well. These projects are filled with many hands-on activities that you will enjoy and want to share with others.

Entomology 1 Novice (EN921)

  • Learn about different insect body parts
  • Learn to identify and classify insects

Entomology 2 Intermediate (EN922)

  • Complete an insect collection table
  • Learn the life cycle and life stages of insects

Entomology 3 Advanced (EN923)

  • Find out how and what different types of insects eat
  • Investigate the importance of wings and flying in insects

Please follow Missouri State Fair entomology box guidelines when building your box. The box size described in some curriculum is slightly different than what the Missouri State Fair requires.

Beekeeping 1 Novice (EN924)

  • Types of bees
  • Honey and wax
  • Plants that attract bees
  • Equipment needed by beekeepers

Beekeeping 2 Intermediate (EN925)

  • Acquire a colony of bees and learn to care for a beehive throughout the year
  • Basic beekeeping operations that result in the production of extracted, chunk or cut comb honey

Beekeeping 3 Advanced (EN926)

  • Increase the number of your honey bee colonies
  • Increase honey production, producing special kinds of honey
  • Bee societies
  • Manage honey bee diseases and parasites

Butterfly Wings (EN927)

  • Learn about butterflies and their role in the environment
  • Investigate butterfly biodiversity, distribution and other topics
  • Participate in citizen science through long-term butterfly monitoring

EXPLORING THE ENVIRONMENT (EE)exploring the environment

How does water pollution affect wildlife? How can you decrease your energy use? Learn the answers to these questions and more in this project.

  • Target audience: ages 11–13
  • These are not sequential projects; you may enroll in either project in any order.

Exploring Your Environment: Ecosystem Services (EE914)

  • Analyze your environment for abundance and scarcity
  • Study global climate change
  • Calculate your ecological footprint

Exploring Your Environment: Earth’s Capacity (EE915)

  • Learn how soil is formed
  • Study the energy required to produce food
  • Evaluate recreation and ecotourism

FORESTRY (FO)forestry

Learn to identify trees, manage woodlands (for pleasure or for profit), understand wood products and preserve the forest for future generations to enjoy.

Forestry 1 Novice (FO931)

  • Identify different types of trees and tree parts
  • Explore characteristics of different forests, what forests need to grow and thrive
  • Learn about the different products people get from trees and forests

Forestry 2 Intermediate (FO932)

  • Take a closer look at the inner-working of trees, forest change and the health benefits trees have on people

Forestry 3 Advanced (FO933)

  • Look at forests on a global scale, learn to care for trees and think about how to conserve forests

GEOLOGY (GG)geology

Much of our knowledge about the earth comes from rocks, minerals and fossils that surround us. Explore the earth- in your backyard, a creek bed, a road cut, anywhere you go.

Geology (FGG941)

  • Distinguish the differences in Igneous, Sedimentary and Metamorphic Rocks
  • Collect specimens, develop a collection, make a display box and exhibit it at the fair

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES (OA)outdoor adventures

A 4-H project for those who like hiking and camping! Progress from day hikes to overnight camping trips, and then to extended backpacking expeditions as you hike through the three activity guides and the helper’s guide. Experiences relate to food, shelter, Leave No Trace ethics, safety, navigation, equipment and camp management.

Outdoor 1 (Hiking) (OA761)

  • Explore hiking for a day
  • Learn about clothing needs
  • Learn how to pack a daypack
  • Learn how to read topographic maps, and orienteering skills

Outdoor 2 (Camping) (OA762)

  • Basics of camping including shelter selection
  • Introduction to Leave No Trace camping skills
  • Learn how to pack a daypack
  • Learn outdoor cooking and environmental awareness and appreciation

Outdoor 3 (Backpacking) (OA763)

  • Focus on being on the trail for extended periods of time
  • Learn clothing needs, tent setup, using backcountry stoves, basic nutrition, menu planning for multi-day hikes, personal hygiene and basic first aid

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)forestry

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Science) (SD952)

  • Biological Sciences
  • Technology and Engineering
  • Physical Sciences, Environmental Education/Earth Sciences
  • Ag in the Classroom
  • Animals
  • Plant Science

SOIL & WATER SCIENCE (SW)soil and water science

The Soil and Water Science project teaches youth about soil, water and environmental stewardship. Learn about soil and water quality, how they interact and how we can protect and preserve them.

Soil and Water Science 1 Novice (SW916)

  • Introduction to basic terms and concepts focusing on understanding important soil and water processes.

Soil and Water Science 2 Intermediate (SW917)

  • Put basic concepts into action to apply more advanced soil and water concepts and interactions with the environment.

Soil and Water Science 3 Advanced (SW918)

  • Activities are divided into chapters based on how you might use the information you have learned — as a homeowner, resident of a watershed, food and fiber producer (farmer), mayor, teacher or legislator.

WEATHER & CLIMATE SCIENCE (WC)weather and climate science

Learn basic information about weather and climate science, including what causes variations in weather and why we have different seasons and climates on the earth. In this project, you will observe and record weather conditions and learn weather symbols.

Weather & Climate Science 1 Novice (WC934)

  • Understand the signs of weather around you
  • Learn the difference between weather and climate
  • Experience how weather affects the things you do

Weather and Climate Science 2 Intermediate (WC935)

  • Understand drivers of weather systems and climate science
  • Learn about air pressure, clouds, wind, humidity and fronts

Weather and Climate Science 3 Advanced (WC936)

  • Explore climate science as a career or potential college major
  • Educate others about weather and climate science

SPORTFISHING (SF)sportfishing

Fishing and MORE! Discover tiny creatures living in Missouri streams and use them to determine water quality. Improve your casting skills. Learn to tie better knots and special purpose knots. Make your own in-line spinner, paint your own jig head or tie your own fly. Understand the "why" of fishing seasons, length limits, daily creel limits and other regulations.

Important note for leaders:

Due to heightened safety considerations, volunteer leaders are required to complete basic Sportfishing certification.

Sportfishing 1 Novice (SF725)

  • Tie knots, cast to a target, rig various lines, select tackle, identify where fish are, identify fish and internal and external fish parts.

Sportfishing 2 Intermediate (SF726)

  • Cast using a spinning rod and fly rod and bait casting reel, practice responsible citizenship, research fishing regulations, decorate a lure, sew a fly wallet, tie an artificial fly & test a water sample.

Sportfishing 3 Advanced (SF727)

Target audience: Grades 9-12

  • Youth develop their leadership and fishing skills as they take a friend fishing, demonstrate how to disassemble and reassemble a fishing reel, design and conduct a sportfishing skill-a-thon, make artificial flies, design and craft a lure, customize tackle, build and use a kick net, respond to ethical situations, and interview a professional fisherman.

WILDLIFE (WI)wildlife

All animals have basic habitat needs that must be supplied in order for their species to survive and thrive. Study the habits and habitat of Missouri wildlife; learn about plant succession and its affect on various species; identify wildlife foods and species by their tracks, skulls, furs or feathers. Put your knowledge to practical use by designing, implementing and completing a habitat improvement project.

Wildlife Conservation 1 Novice (WI720)

  • Learn about the history of wildlife conservation
  • Explore the values of wildlife to humans

Wildlife Conservation 2 Intermediate (WI721)

  • Learn about wildlife habitats
  • Explore wildlife communities and ecosystems Living Wild in an Ecosystem
  • Learn about the interface between people and wildlife
  • Explore why and how we manage wildlife

Wildlife Conservation 3 Advanced (WI722)

  • Learn about the interface between people and wildlife
  • Explore why and how we manage wildlife

Environmental Science & Natural Resources

AMPHIBIANS & REPTILES | BEEKEEPING | ENTOMOLOGY | EXPLORING THE ENVIRONMENT | FORESTRY OUTDOOR | SOIL & WATER SCIENCE | WEATHER & CLIMATE | SPORTFISHING | WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
environmental science
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AMPHIBIANS & REPTILES (AR)amphibians and reptiles

Do you know the difference between reptiles and amphibians? Can you name and identify the venomous snakes of Missouri? In these projects, you’ll step outside into the natural world, become an amateur herpetologist and discover interesting facts about amphibians and reptiles.

Amphibians and Reptiles (AR611)

  • Learn how some toads and frogs can vocalize underwater
  • Identify the three different types of habitats Missouri lizards live in
  • Distinguish between a venomous and nonvenomous snake

ENTOMOLOGY (EN)entomology

Explore the amazing world of insects and their fellow arthropod relatives. Learn the differences between bugs and insects, explore bee husbandry, and identify the stages of insect life cycles. Create an entomology box so that others can learn about insects as well. These projects are filled with many hands-on activities that you will enjoy and want to share with others.

Entomology 1 Novice (EN921)

  • Learn about different insect body parts
  • Learn to identify and classify insects

Entomology 2 Intermediate (EN922)

  • Complete an insect collection table
  • Learn the life cycle and life stages of insects

Entomology 3 Advanced (EN923)

  • Find out how and what different types of insects eat
  • Investigate the importance of wings and flying in insects

Please follow Missouri State Fair entomology box guidelines when building your box. The box size described in some curriculum is slightly different than what the Missouri State Fair requires.

Beekeeping 1 Novice (EN924)

  • Types of bees
  • Honey and wax
  • Plants that attract bees
  • Equipment needed by beekeepers

Beekeeping 2 Intermediate (EN925)

  • Acquire a colony of bees and learn to care for a beehive throughout the year
  • Basic beekeeping operations that result in the production of extracted, chunk or cut comb honey

Beekeeping 3 Advanced (EN926)

  • Increase the number of your honey bee colonies
  • Increase honey production, producing special kinds of honey
  • Bee societies
  • Manage honey bee diseases and parasites

Butterfly Wings (EN927)

  • Learn about butterflies and their role in the environment
  • Investigate butterfly biodiversity, distribution and other topics
  • Participate in citizen science through long-term butterfly monitoring

EXPLORING THE ENVIRONMENT (EE)exploring the environment

How does water pollution affect wildlife? How can you decrease your energy use? Learn the answers to these questions and more in this project.

  • Target audience: ages 11–13
  • These are not sequential projects; you may enroll in either project in any order.

Exploring Your Environment: Ecosystem Services (EE914)

  • Analyze your environment for abundance and scarcity
  • Study global climate change
  • Calculate your ecological footprint

Exploring Your Environment: Earth’s Capacity (EE915)

  • Learn how soil is formed
  • Study the energy required to produce food
  • Evaluate recreation and ecotourism

FORESTRY (FO)forestry

Learn to identify trees, manage woodlands (for pleasure or for profit), understand wood products and preserve the forest for future generations to enjoy.

Forestry 1 Novice (FO931)

  • Identify different types of trees and tree parts
  • Explore characteristics of different forests, what forests need to grow and thrive
  • Learn about the different products people get from trees and forests

Forestry 2 Intermediate (FO932)

  • Take a closer look at the inner-working of trees, forest change and the health benefits trees have on people

Forestry 3 Advanced (FO933)

  • Look at forests on a global scale, learn to care for trees and think about how to conserve forests

GEOLOGY (GG)geology

Much of our knowledge about the earth comes from rocks, minerals and fossils that surround us. Explore the earth- in your backyard, a creek bed, a road cut, anywhere you go.

Geology (FGG941)

  • Distinguish the differences in Igneous, Sedimentary and Metamorphic Rocks
  • Collect specimens, develop a collection, make a display box and exhibit it at the fair

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES (OA)outdoor adventures

A 4-H project for those who like hiking and camping! Progress from day hikes to overnight camping trips, and then to extended backpacking expeditions as you hike through the three activity guides and the helper’s guide. Experiences relate to food, shelter, Leave No Trace ethics, safety, navigation, equipment and camp management.

Outdoor 1 (Hiking) (OA761)

  • Explore hiking for a day
  • Learn about clothing needs
  • Learn how to pack a daypack
  • Learn how to read topographic maps, and orienteering skills

Outdoor 2 (Camping) (OA762)

  • Basics of camping including shelter selection
  • Introduction to Leave No Trace camping skills
  • Learn how to pack a daypack
  • Learn outdoor cooking and environmental awareness and appreciation

Outdoor 3 (Backpacking) (OA763)

  • Focus on being on the trail for extended periods of time
  • Learn clothing needs, tent setup, using backcountry stoves, basic nutrition, menu planning for multi-day hikes, personal hygiene and basic first aid

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)forestry

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Science) (SD952)

  • Biological Sciences
  • Technology and Engineering
  • Physical Sciences, Environmental Education/Earth Sciences
  • Ag in the Classroom
  • Animals
  • Plant Science

SOIL & WATER SCIENCE (SW)soil and water science

The Soil and Water Science project teaches youth about soil, water and environmental stewardship. Learn about soil and water quality, how they interact and how we can protect and preserve them.

Soil and Water Science 1 Novice (SW916)

  • Introduction to basic terms and concepts focusing on understanding important soil and water processes.

Soil and Water Science 2 Intermediate (SW917)

  • Put basic concepts into action to apply more advanced soil and water concepts and interactions with the environment.

Soil and Water Science 3 Advanced (SW918)

  • Activities are divided into chapters based on how you might use the information you have learned — as a homeowner, resident of a watershed, food and fiber producer (farmer), mayor, teacher or legislator.

WEATHER & CLIMATE SCIENCE (WC)weather and climate science

Learn basic information about weather and climate science, including what causes variations in weather and why we have different seasons and climates on the earth. In this project, you will observe and record weather conditions and learn weather symbols.

Weather & Climate Science 1 Novice (WC934)

  • Understand the signs of weather around you
  • Learn the difference between weather and climate
  • Experience how weather affects the things you do

Weather and Climate Science 2 Intermediate (WC935)

  • Understand drivers of weather systems and climate science
  • Learn about air pressure, clouds, wind, humidity and fronts

Weather and Climate Science 3 Advanced (WC936)

  • Explore climate science as a career or potential college major
  • Educate others about weather and climate science

SPORTFISHING (SF)sportfishing

Fishing and MORE! Discover tiny creatures living in Missouri streams and use them to determine water quality. Improve your casting skills. Learn to tie better knots and special purpose knots. Make your own in-line spinner, paint your own jig head or tie your own fly. Understand the "why" of fishing seasons, length limits, daily creel limits and other regulations.

Important note for leaders:

Due to heightened safety considerations, volunteer leaders are required to complete basic Sportfishing certification.

Sportfishing 1 Novice (SF725)

  • Tie knots, cast to a target, rig various lines, select tackle, identify where fish are, identify fish and internal and external fish parts.

Sportfishing 2 Intermediate (SF726)

  • Cast using a spinning rod and fly rod and bait casting reel, practice responsible citizenship, research fishing regulations, decorate a lure, sew a fly wallet, tie an artificial fly & test a water sample.

Sportfishing 3 Advanced (SF727)

Target audience: Grades 9-12

  • Youth develop their leadership and fishing skills as they take a friend fishing, demonstrate how to disassemble and reassemble a fishing reel, design and conduct a sportfishing skill-a-thon, make artificial flies, design and craft a lure, customize tackle, build and use a kick net, respond to ethical situations, and interview a professional fisherman.

WILDLIFE (WI)wildlife

All animals have basic habitat needs that must be supplied in order for their species to survive and thrive. Study the habits and habitat of Missouri wildlife; learn about plant succession and its affect on various species; identify wildlife foods and species by their tracks, skulls, furs or feathers. Put your knowledge to practical use by designing, implementing and completing a habitat improvement project.

Wildlife Conservation 1 Novice (WI720)

  • Learn about the history of wildlife conservation
  • Explore the values of wildlife to humans

Wildlife Conservation 2 Intermediate (WI721)

  • Learn about wildlife habitats
  • Explore wildlife communities and ecosystems Living Wild in an Ecosystem
  • Learn about the interface between people and wildlife
  • Explore why and how we manage wildlife

Wildlife Conservation 3 Advanced (WI722)

  • Learn about the interface between people and wildlife
  • Explore why and how we manage wildlife

 

 

 

Plant & Animal Science

AGRONOMY | BEEF | DAIRY | FLORICULTURE | GARDENING | GOATS | HORSES | LIVESTOCK JUDGING MEATS | PETS | POULTRY | RABBITS | SHEEP | SWINE | VETERINARY SCIENCE

 

plant and animal science
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AGRONOMY: FIELD CROPS (AG)agronomy field crops

Agronomy is the science of using plants for food, fuel, feed and fiber. 4-H projects in agronomy explore the areas of plant genetics, soil science and even the weather. Agronomists hold professions in many areas and have roles that include creating healthier food, managing environmental impacts of crop production, and creating energy from plants.

Field Crops 1 Novice (AG982)

  • Discover the world of farming
  • Learn how plants grow
  • Learn the value and uses of field crops

Field Crops 2 Intermediate (AG983)

  • • Take a soil sample
  • • Learn about the products made from field crops
  • • Decide what crops to grow and at what time

Field Crops 3 Advanced (AG984)

  • Learn about integrated crop management
  • Discover hybrid selection
  • Find out more about harvesting and marketing crops

BEEF (BF)beef

Through the beef project, you’ll learn the necessary skills to properly raise and care for your beef animal, while exploring the production sectors of the beef industry. Topics include management techniques, the different cuts of beef, how to prepare your animal for the fair and what vaccinations to administer to prevent disease.

Beef 1 Novice (BF121)

  • Identify beef breeds
  • Choose feed ingredients
  • Halter breaking and fitting

Beef 2 Intermediate (BF122)

  • Understanding the digestive system
  • Evaluating structure
  • Learn beef meat cuts

Beef 3 Advanced (BF123)

  • Advanced nutrition and health
  • Yield grading
  • Reproductive systems

Bucket Calf Project (BC135)

Young people ages 8 to 12 learn to care and nurture a newborn calf with bottles or a bucket. Those who have had their 13th birthday by Jan. 1 of the current year would be ineligible. Acquire a calf within two weeks of its birth between March 1 and June 1 of the current project year. If shown, calf should be at least 90 days old. Calves born in late May or June 1 may not be old enough to show in the county fair. Check with your local MU Extension center for local requirements.

CATS (CA)cats

The Cats project helps you explore how a cat can fit into your family’s lifestyle and how to be an excellent caretaker of your feline friend. You’ll learn about nutritional aspects of a cat’s diet, health needs and practicing responsible ownership.

Cat Care 1 Novice (CA177)

  • Identify different cat breeds and parts of the cat
  • Learn how to care for your new cat
  • Intro to care including grooming, feeding, safety and health care

Cat Care 2 Intermediate (CA178)

  • Learn cat origins, breeds and characteristics
  • Skill areas emphasized: how to select a cat or kitten, nutrition, health care, emergencies and first aid

Cat Care 3 Advanced (CA179)

  • Study the anatomy and behavior of your cat
  • Care of pregnant cats and kittens

FOR ALL ANIMAL EXHIBITORS: To exhibit your livestock project at the Missouri State Fair, you must have completed the enrollment process in your county 4-H program, and have met all local criteria including compliance with the 4-H Show-Me Quality Assurance Policy.

DAIRY (DA)dairy

The Dairy project is a fun way to learn about the management and care of dairy cattle and the many career opportunities in the dairy industry. Activities in this project will help you gain knowledge in learning proper feeding, health, selection and marketing. You will also learn about the many dairy products and various uses of cow’s milk.

Dairy 1 Novice (DA131)

  • Select your project animal
  • Practice record keeping
  • Prepare for the show

Dairy 2 Intermediate (DA132)

  • Handling and caring for your animals
  • Milking, marketing and careers
  • Judging and identification

Dairy 3 Advanced (DA133)

  • Balancing a ration
  • Reproduction and breeding
  • Managing your herd

Judging Dairy Cattle (DA134)

  • What are the characteristics to look for in a prize dairy animal that yields the most milk? Learn to evaluate animals, place them like a pro and justify your decision.

GOATS (GA)goats

DAIRY GOATS

This section is for those looking to explore the opportunities surrounding raising dairy goats. You will learn about goat breeds, management practices, grooming and showmanship. Discover how diary goat milk is used to meet the needs of consumers.

Dairy Goats 1 Novice (GA136)

  • Selecting your goat project animal
  • Showing your project
  • Goat dairy products

Dairy Goats 2 Intermediate (GA137)

  • Nutrition and feeds
  • Reproduction and raising your kids
  • Practice your judging skills

Dairy Goats 3 Advanced (GA138)

  • Managing health and parasites
  • Genetics and reproduction
  • Global role of goats

MEAT GOATS

In this area of the goat project, you will immerse yourself in meat goat industry. You will gain a deeper understanding on key management practices, meat goat breeds, and how to prep your animal for exhibition.

Meat Goats 1 Novice (GA125)

  • Meat goat breeds
  • Caring for your kids
  • Choosing the best feeds

Meat Goats 2 Intermediate (GA126)

  • Breeding and genetic selection
  • Feed rations
  • Showing your goat

Meat Goats 3 Advanced (GA127)

  • Health management and parasites
  • Marketing your animals
  • Managing resources

DOGS (DG)dogs

If your best friend is your dog, then you’ll like this project. Together you will learn about dog obedience, grooming and nutrition to help your dog live a long and happy life. As you advance, you can participate in showmanship contests where you’ll teach your dog to retrieve, jump hurdles, drop on recall and broad jump.

Each of these levels of Dog includes knowledge, obedience and showmanship.

Dog 1 Novice (DG171)

  • Choosing your dog
  • Practice dog behavior and training
  • Basic Grooming

Dog Intermediate (DG172)

  • Investigate your dog breed
  • Nutrition and parasites
  • Fitting and showing

Dog 3 Advanced (DG173)

  • Health and breeding
  • Dogs and service

HORTICULTURE (HO)horticulture

FLORICULTURE

Enjoy activities and opportunities working with flowers inside and outside. Learn arranging, pest management and plant science. Whether you live in a high-rise apartment or have a large yard, this project has something fun for you.

Floriculture 1 Novice (HO961)

  • Planning a rainbow garden
  • Learning the parts of a flower
  • Transplanting plants
  • Keeping plants healthy

Floriculture 2 Intermediate (HO962)

  • Learning about perennials, house plants and starting seeds
  • Planning a theme garden and indoor landscaping
  • How to identify and control pests
  • How to dry flowers and make potpourri

Floriculture 3 Advanced (HO963)

(previously Floriculture 3 & 4)

  • Develop planter gardens, take cuttings from plants, preserve flowers and create dried arrangements and terrariums
  • Learn principles of design and the importance of soil pH
  • How to identify and control pests
  • Create flowers you can wear and make bows
  • Develop an all season garden and learn to force bulbs
  • Learn the principles of design and the importance of soil pH
  • Experience tissue cultures and floral science
  • Explore greenhouse gardening, planning a floral business and create flower arrangements

GARDENING (fruits & vegetables)

Get outside and dig in the soil; you can grow your own fruit and vegetable garden with this project. Learn basic gardening techniques, how to plan a garden and related career options and entrepreneurship opportunities.

Gardening 1 Novice (HO971)

  • Plan and plant a garden
  • Learn what different plant parts do

Gardening 2 Intermediate (HO972)

  • Transplant plants into your garden
  • Grow plants from plant parts

Gardening 3 Advanced (HO973)

(previously Gardening 3 & 4)

  • Learn about succession planting
  • Find out about photosynthesis
  • Identify pest damage
  • Use intercrop and double crop planting methods
  • Identify plant diseases

LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Landscape Design 1 Novice (HO975)

  • Learn about careers in landscaping
  • Use design principles in landscapes

Landscape Design 2 Intermediate (HO976)

  • Explore various characteristics of landscape plants
  • Learn skills necessary to landscape professionals

Landscape Design 3 Advanced (HO977)

  • Develop maps and drawings for landscape plans
  • Learn skills necessary to landscape professionals
  • Create a landscape portfolio

PETS (PE)pets

This project will help you to learn how to raise a small animal or pet, how to select the right small animal for your circumstances and environment, and how to give urban pets proper housing, care and health. You will also learn how to prepare your animal for exhibition. Participants will explore possible careers that may let you take your interest in small animals to the next level.

Pets 1 Novice (PE101)

  • Choosing your pet
  • Getting to know your pet
  • Caring for your pet

Pets 2 Intermediate (PE102)

  • Characteristics of your pet
  • Keeping your pet healthy

Pets 3 Advanced (PE103)

  • Pet reproduction
  • Careers and leadership opportunities

GUINEA PIGS

In this project, members own and care for one or more guinea pigs. This is an excellent project for youth who live where they cannot keep larger animals. In this project, 4-H members learn about the feeding, management and record keeping involved with raising guinea pigs.

Guinea Pigs (Cavies) (PE104)

  • Learn general care, history, anatomy, selection, housing and equipment, records
  • Learn nutrition, health, show preparation, marketing and other aspects of care

HORSES (HS)horses

HORSELESS HORSE & HORSE KNOWLEDGE

Horseless Horse & Horse Knowledge are for all who want to learn about horses, including those without their own horse or pony. Through this project areas you will increase your knowledge in horse anatomy and physiology, management, and the equine industry. Participants will get to explore the exciting career opportunities available through the equine industry.

Horseless Horse & Horse Knowledge (HS140)

  • Learn about horse behavior
  • Discover basic horse safety
  • Equine anatomy and physiology
  • Feeds and nutrition
  • Genetics and reproduction
  • Care and costs of horses

HORSE RIDING

Horse Riding introduces basic riding skills and styles. Because a member’s knowledge might be at a different level from his or her riding skills, a member may sign up for both units HS140 and HS141, and unit HS140 will not be counted against his or her project total count.

Horse Riding (HS141)

  • Tack and tools to work with horses
  • Basic riding
  • Horsemanship skills
  • Getting ready to show
  • Horse training
  • Advanced riding

LIVESTOCK JUDGING (LJ)livestock judging

Engage in a project that will allow you to learn the visual and genetic characteristics to look for in the ideal production food animal. You will also explore the differences in evaluation criteria between production classes of livestock.

Livestock Judging (LJ117)

  • Learn to evaluate animals, judge them like a pro and justify your decision.
  • Project enrollment is not required to participate in 4-H livestock judging contests at the state level.

MEATS (ME)meats

There is nothing like delicious country-cured ham or bacon. Or what about the taste of barbecue just off the grill? Learn how to cure your own ham and/or bacon, identify different meat retail and wholesale cuts, select a quality meat product and then know how to prepare it for a meal. These hands-on activities and experiences will last you a lifetime.

NOTE: Use of Borax is NOT an approved practice for curing hams.

Country Cured Bacon (ME114)

Country Cured Ham (ME115)

MEATS EVALUATION

Develop understanding of how properties of yield and quality influence the evaluation of beef, pork and lamb. Participants will learn to identify retail cuts and what sets them apart from other cuts. You will also gain confidence, as you learn to create a set of reasons to defend your placing of a class.

Meat Evaluation Project (ME116)

POULTRY (PO)poultry

Identifying poultry parts, species and breeds, selection, exploring an egg, cooking an egg, feeding, handling, washing and showing are activities included in the 4-H poultry project. In the intermediate level you will learn how to read a feed tag, explore retail products, grade carcasses, select layers and manage poultry health. Advanced poultry members will develop leadership skills by planning a judging clinic, managing a flock, exploring careers, processing chickens, conducting poultry games and discussing values and ethics.

Poultry 1 Novice (PO151)

  • Selecting the right bird for you
  • Learn about poultry product and production

Poultry 2 Intermediate (PO152)

  • Selecting and judging poultry
  • Explore careers and industry

Poultry 3 Advanced (PO153)

  • Meat science and food safety in poultry
  • Raising poultry and genetics

RABBITS (RB)rabbits

Whether you see rabbits as soft and cuddly pets or a business opportunity, the rabbit project is flexible for your interest. In this project you’ll learn to identify parts, determine sex, check for disqualifications, practicing handling, trimming nails, showing and many other management practices.

Rabbits 1 Novice (RB111)

  • Caring for your rabbit
  • Rabbit breeding and health

Rabbits 2 Intermediate (RB112)

  • Breed characteristics
  • Health care and disease prevention

Rabbits 3 Advanced (RB113)

  • Breeding and genetics
  • Showing your rabbits

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)self-determined

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Science) (SD952)

  • Biological Sciences
  • Technology and Engineering
  • Physical Sciences, Environmental Education/Earth Sciences
  • Ag in the Classroom
  • Animals
  • Plant Science

SHEEP (SH)sheep

The sheep project explores a wide variety of fun and challenging activities including identifying parts of a sheep, selecting a project lamb, sheep care/management, and identification of lamb meat products. You will also learn how to prepare your sheep for show.

Sheep 1 Novice (SH161)

  • Selecting your project lamb
  • Learn about lamb products beyond wool and meat

Sheep 2 Intermediate (SH162)

  • Care and nutritional needs of your animals
  • Creating a plan for the health of your project

Sheep 3 Advanced (SH163)

  • Starting your flock, breeding and genetics
  • Marketing your project

SWINE (SW)swine

Explore a wide variety of topics relating to swine production and the swine industry. Topics include swine breeds, proper care and management, and identification of the different meat products. Hands-on activities including practicing fitting and showing swine, managing baby pigs, balancing a ration, and designing a swine operation.

Swine 1 Novice (SW181)

  • Learn breeds and hog parts
  • Create a budget and management plan

Swine 2 Intermediate (SW182)

  • Judging on foot and rail
  • Exploring diseases and parasites
  • Digestive health and feeding

Swine 3 Advanced (SW183)

  • Plan your breeding program
  • Balancing rations for different needs
  • Careers in the pork industry

VETERINARY SCIENCE (VS)veterinary science

Learn the role a veterinarian plays in practicing animal and public health while participating in many hands-on activities. These activities will help you learn about the different equipment used by veterinarians, diseases and health problems, and career opportunities as a veterinarian or volunteer.

Target audience: Grades 9-12

Veterinary Science 1 Novice (VS191)

  • Introduction to the fundamentals of veterinary science
  • Learn what is "normal" and "abnormal" in regards to animal health

Veterinary Science 2 Intermediate (VS192)

  • Explore the field of animal disease
  • Learn how the body reacts to health problems

Veterinary Science 3 Advanced (VS193)

  • Further study in the veterinary profession
  • Look into preventative care aspects

 

 

 

Leadership & Personal Development

COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS | CIVIC ENGAGEMENT | ENTREPRENEURSHIP GLOBAL EDUCATION | LEADERSHIP | PERSONAL FINANCE

 

leadership and personal development
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CAREER EXPLORATIONS (CE)career explorations

Your career awaits! Learn how to prepare for a career that interests you. Decide what kinds of work are a good match for your talents and abilities. Discover choices for education and training after high school, and what they cost. Investigate salaries, benefits, and careers in demand. Create a career portfolio. Learn how job shadowing and volunteer work can take you down the path to your chosen career.

Target audience: ages 14–18

Career Explorations (CE100)

  • Identify how your skills and interests tie in to career choices
  • Find and land an internship
  • Identify college degrees and training you will need for your career
  • Build a portfolio of career skills and abilities
  • Explore entrepreneurship as a career option
  • Learn how to search and apply for jobs, create a resume, and nail that interview

COMMUNICATIONS (CM)communications

Have you ever had an important idea to share? Would you like to get better at meeting friends and influencing people? Improving your communication skills through this project can make every part of your life better, and you’ll have a lot of fun along the way.

Communications 1 Novice (CM237)

Target Audience: Grades 3-5

  • Building confidence
  • Active listening
  • Identifying aggression

Communications 2 Intermediate (CM238)

Target Audience: Grades 6-8

  • Conflict resolution
  • Cultural differences
  • Online communication

Communications 3 Advanced (CM239)

Target Audience: Grades 9-12

  • Evaluating advertising
  • Leadership and teamwork
  • Resumes and cover letters

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT (CI)civic engagement

Ready to plan and take action on an issue facing youth, your community or your world? Ready to learn skills you can use as a civic leader, council member, administrator, or future mayor? Explore active citizenship and the role of government in addressing youth and community issues.

Target audience: ages 11–18; adaptable for ages 8–10

Civic Engagement (CI200)

(previously Citizenship-CI200)

  • Learn what citizenship is and why it’s important to be involved in your community
  • "Public" vs. "private" - what is the difference?
  • Consider interests of your group and needs of your community
  • Identify community stakeholders who can help
  • Learn how to write a mission statement, conduct a survey, create a petition, raise funds and media coverage

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (EP)entrepreneurship

Start earning money doing what you love! Find business opportunities in 4-H and your community. Come up with ideas and solutions for solving problems. Create a startup plan for turning an idea into reality.

Target audience: ages 11–18; adaptable for ages 8–10

Entrepreneurship 1 Novice (EP442)

  • Become a business investigator. Learn what entrepreneurs do and find innovators around you. Explore what it takes to be a successful businessperson. Explore ideas and business opportunities you might want to try.

Entrepreneurship 2 Intermediate (EP443)

  • Take your business investigation to the next level. Investigate what you value and how you can make a difference, dress like a pro, manage your time and make the sale.

Entrepreneurship 3 Advanced (EP444)

  • Become a master business investigator. Explore business ideas, set goals, conduct market research, determine a price, manage your money, and create a plan to start and run your own biz.

GLOBAL EDUCATION (GE)global education

Do you ever wonder what kids from other cultures do for fun? What do they eat? What language do they speak? In this project you will have the opportunity to learn about other cultures, similarities and differences among families around the world. It will also prepare you for a possible exchange experience in the future. See page 54 for additional opportunities.

Global Education (GE221)

LEADERSHIP (LD)leadership

Life brings many situations where good leadership skills can make a difference: working on a group project in a class, being part of a team, finding yourself with people about to make a mistake, owning your own business or even being an elected leader. You’ll make a bigger difference by knowing how to make good decisions, build relationships, organize your life and plan for success.

Leadership 1 Novice (LD271)

Target audience: Grades 3-5

  • Communication
  • Cooperation
  • Resolving differences

Leadership 2 Intermediate (LD272)

Target audience: Grades 6-8

  • Lifelong leadership skills
  • Cross-cultural leadership
  • Leadership Environments

Leadership 3 Advanced (LD273)

  • Planning and organizing
  • Relationship building
  • Group process

CONSUMER SAVVY (CS)consumer savvy

Young people like you consume more than $175 billion in goods and services each year. This project will help you become a better informed and more responsible consumer in today’s dynamic marketplace. Learn what it means to be a consumer through saving, spending and sharing.

Consumer 1 Novice (CS431)

Learn about…

  • Spending, bargain shopping and getting the best buy
  • Online shopping
  • Saving

Consumer 2 Intermediate (CS432)

Learn about…

  • Consumer rights and responsibilities
  • Consumer decisions
  • Advertising
  • Consumer internet safety

Consumer 3 Advanced (CS433)

Learn about…

  • Consumers in the global marketplace
  • Consumer rights
  • Living on your own

FINANCIAL LITERACY (LD)financial literacy

Develop the skills you’ll need to successfully manage your personal and perhaps business finances. This project focuses on understanding financial decisions and consequences and knowing your rights and responsibilities as a consumer.

Financial Literacy 1 (FL421)

Target audience: Grades 5-8

  • Learn how to define wants and needs
  • Learn to track expenses and develop a spending plan
  • Learn about banks and savings plans
  • Learn about the consequences of using credit

Financial Literacy 2 (FL422)

Target audience: Grades 9-12

  • Learn about earning income and career planning
  • Learn to set goals and develop spending and saving plans
  • Learn about banks, credit unions and credit reports
  • Learn about investments

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)self-determined

A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Citizenship, Leadership and Communication) (SD950)

  • Civic Engagement
  • Community/Volunteer Service
  • Leadership & Personal Development
  • Communications & Expressive Arts

 

 

 

Communication & Expressive Arts

ARTS & CRAFTS | CLOWNING | FIBER ARTS | FILMMAKING | INTERIOR DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY | PUBLIC SPEAKING | QUILTING | SCRAPBOOKING | SEWING | THEARTRE ARTS

 

ARTS AND CRAFTS (AC)

arts and crafts
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Through hands-on activities such as cutting and pasting, sculpting, drawing, printing and construction, you’ll explore your creativity and have the chance to discover a hobby you might enjoy for the rest of your life. Experience different arts and crafts related careers, culture, science and technology.

Arts and Crafts (AC311)

  • Build an artistic foundation

Visual Arts: Drawing, fiber arts and sculpture (AC312)

  • Emphasis on drawing, fiber arts and sculpture

Visual Arts: painting, printing and graphics design (AC313)

  • Emphasis on painting, printing and graphic design

Graphic Design (AC314)

(previously called Arts and Computers)

  • Continue building an artistic foundation with technology in mind

Scrapbooking (AC315)

  • Explore personalization and the creativity of scrapbooking
  • Understand design and presentation considerations

CLOTHING (CL)

clothing
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When friends ask you who made your outfit, you can say with pride, "I was the designer and tailor!" These clothing projects will teach you the basics like threading a sewing machine or sewing a pillow. The advanced units will also teach you how to take the design of your choice and customize it for the perfect look, color and fit. You’ll also learn about what it means to be a good consumer both on the side of the manufacturer and on the side of a buyer.

SEWING (CONSTRUCTED)

Sewing 1 Novice (CL521)

  • Get prepared to sew (notions, color, fabrics, and sewing machine parts)
  • Learn about fabrics and fibers
  • Layout, cut out and mark patterns
  • Sew plain, zigzag and curved seams

Sewing 2 Intermediate (CL522)

  • Learn about fabrics
  • Finish a seam, sew darts and gathers and sew a button and button hole
  • Sew a pocket, sleeve, cuffs and collar and use interfacing
  • Learn hand sewing skills

Sewing 3 Advanced (CL523)

  • Learn about sergers, fabric pressing techniques, and specialty seam and hem finishes
  • Experiment with fabric properties, laundry detergents and additives
  • Learn to adjust and design patterns and use interfacing and lining
  • Learn tailoring techniques and how to develop a business out of sewing skills

PURCHASED

Clothing and textile consumer skills are emphasized in this project. You’ll gain confidence in your appearance and ability to select accessories and care for clothing.

Shopping in Style (CL524)

(previously called Clothes you Buy)

  • Gain an understanding of cultural influences in clothing choices
  • Create a personal clothing budget
  • Learn about clothing care, repair and storage
  • Compare and contrast different purchasing options

CLOWNING (CW)

clowning
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Clowning is part of a grand and noble tradition dating back centuries. You’ll learn about some of history’s great performers who influenced modern day clowning as well as clown etiquette and how to create your own clown face and costume. From props to pantomime, this project will teach you funny new techniques and help you find great ways to perform them.

Clowning (CW231)

  • Explore clowning as a communication outlet
  • Learn the basics of pantomime and ventriloquism
  • Build confidence through performance and self-expression

CROCHET (CR)

crochet
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A sweater, an afghan and a hat are all things that can be crocheted. This art of yarn/thread and crochet hooks can become a hobby you can take anywhere. Amaze your family and friends with the special gifts you make for them.

Crochet (CR321)

  • Learn to work stitches, rows and rounds
  • Join pieces, change colors and determine gauge and sizing

FILMMAKING (FM)

filmmaking
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Sharing your creativity with the world can be fun, but doing so with solid filmmaking skills is even better. Many important life skills can be developed through filmmaking, including communication, self- expression, decision-making, problem-solving and critical thinking. Learn at your own pace, through a series of video modules from national, state, and local opportunities. Through local training, national resources and special events like FilmFest 4-H, you can attain the skills to express your vision at the highest level!

Filmmaking (FM270)

  • Bring ideas from your imagination to reality
  • Explore communications technologies
  • Learn how TV, film, and productions are made
  • Learn to be a producer - not just a consumer - of digital media

INTERIOR DESIGN (ID)

interior design
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Do you walk into a room and know exactly what colors and what furniture would look good in the space? How do you create a feeling of coziness in a family room? Being an interior designer is all about making a house a home. Develop a designer’s touch by navigating through four sections of this curriculum.

Interior Design 1 Novice (ID471)

(previously Home Environment 1)

  • Learn and apply basic design concepts to walls, windows and floors

Interior Design 2 Intermediate (ID472)

(previously Home Environment 2)

  • Explore how to design with style as you plan, select and care for furniture, fabrics and decorative items for a room

Interior Design 3 Advanced (ID473)

(previously Home Environment 3 & 4)

  • Learn about accessories and adding personality and interest to a room
  • Create a home that is healthy, energy efficient, and conserves natural resources

KNITTING (KN)

knitting
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Learn knitting techniques and tips! Many professions use techniques learned in knitting (think, surgeons); other professions use the concentration acquired (think, acting or engineering).

Knitting (KN331)

  • Learn to make scarves, hats, mittens, socks, afghans, purses, pillows and more

PHOTOGRAPHY (PH)

photography
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Capture important moments, communicate your perspective and show how life appears through your lens with photography. Learn about cameras, lighting, and digital and film media so you can be ready when you find that great shot. Build skills you can use to excel in other areas of life as well and explore possible new careers.

Photography 1 Novice (PH351)

Learn photography basics such as:

  • Equipment
  • Proper lighting
  • Creating good composition to build your skills as a photographer

Photography 2 Intermediate (PH352)

Advance your knowledge further with these skills:

  • Depth of field
  • Backlighting
  • Rule of thirds

Photography 3 Advanced (PH353)

  • Learn more exciting techniques
  • Learn when rules of photography can be broken, how to use color to your advantage
  • Put together an attractive and interesting portfolio and learn how to exhibit your work professionally.

PUBLIC SPEAKING (PS)

public speaking
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From sharing an important thought to nailing that first big job interview, public speaking skills are extremely important. Public speaking allows you to challenge yourself and succeed in developing communication skills, while having fun and building friendships. Although public speaking is among the most common of fears, every 4-H member can learn to do this well and even enjoy it!

Public Speaking (PS242)

  • Learn how to prepare and deliver speeches in front of crowds with confidence
  • Explore how the pros build this skill
  • Learn to handle various speaking situations
  • Deliver different types of speeches, and resolve problems you may experience along the way

QUILTING (QU)

quilting
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Do you have a favorite quilt that someone special has made for you? Maybe it has been passed down from generation to generation. This project will teach you quilting techniques so you can create wonderful quilts and other useful, fun items.

Quilting 1 Novice (QU341)

(previously Quilting 1 & 2)

  • Beginners explore ideas and designs of quilts with squares and rectangles
  • Make designs using basic triangles — half square, quarter square and equilateral triangles

Quilting 2 Intermediate (QU342)

(previously Quilting 3 & 4)

  • Learn more about fabrics and how to combine them into quilted items
  • Explore ideas and designs for paper piecing using original, multiple small paper piecing patterns

Quilting 3 Advanced (QU343)

(previously Quilting 5 & 6)

  • Learn to use embroidery and many other ways to embellish your quilts
  • Try several projects, each using a different format for applique

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)

self determined
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A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Citizenship, Leadership and Communication) (SD950)

  • Civic Engagement
  • Community/Volunteer Service
  • Leadership & Personal Development
  • Communications & Expressive Arts

THEATRE ARTS (TA)

theatre arts
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Learn about the fascinating world of make-believe. Create sound effects, make puppets and perform a skit. Try your hand at improvisation, create disguises and design costumes. Sound interesting? Then cast yourself into Theatre Arts!

Youth will practice and learn aspects of:

  • Communication
  • Character Development
  • Play Development
  • Play Production
  • Theatre as projected Play

Theatre Arts 1 Novice (TA251)

Theatre Arts 2 Intermediate (TA252)

Theatre Arts 3 Advanced (TA253)

Each level of this curriculum builds on the previous level.

 

 

 

Healthy Living

BREADS | CAKE DECORATING | FOODS | FOOD SCIENCE | FIRST AID MOVE ACROSS MISSOURI | SPORTS & FITNESS | SQUARE DANCING

 

CAKE DECORATING (CD)

cake decorating
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From simple borders and decorations to more complex methods such as lattice work and tiered cakes, learn to make and decorate cakes and cookies. You’ll use your creativity to design baked goods your way and be introduced to a money-making skill and potential careers.

Cake Decorating 1 Novice (CD361)

  • Bake and frost single-layer cakes
  • Learn basic decorating procedures

Cake Decorating 2 Intermediate (CD362)

  • Bake two-layer cakes
  • Make flowers, borders, and special effects like lace, lattice work, basket weave and more

Cake Decorating 3 Advanced (CD363)

  • Bake stacked and tiered cakes
  • Master flower making

FOODS/NUTRITION/PRESERVATION (FN)

foods nutrition preservation
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COOKING

Learn about food preparation, food and kitchen safety, food science, meal planning, and nutrition. Each manual builds on the skills learned in the previous level, and members complete project activities for each level in two to three years.

Foods 1 Novice (FN551)

Learn about:

  • Kitchen basics
  • Food and kitchen safety
  • How to measure
  • How to prepare simple recipes

Foods 2 Intermediate (FN552)

Learn about:

  • Fire safety in the kitchen
  • Nutrition labels
  • Preparing recipes and a meal

Foods 3 Advanced (FN553)

(previously Foods 3 & 4)

Learn about:

  • Outdoor cooking
  • Party planning
  • Preparing recipes from different food groups
  • Cooking with spices and herbs
  • Preparing celebration meals
  • Advanced dessert preparation

FOOD SCIENCE

Hands-on experiments help you discover the science behind the foods you eat. Each youth What’s on Your Plate curriculum contains a different facilitator guide for leaders.

Target audience: Grades 5-12

Food Science 1 (FS566)

  • Learn about the science of baked goods and the best methods for preparing these foods

Food Science 2 Intermediate (FS567)

  • Explore the way eggs are used in foods and how milk turns into cheese

Food Science 3 Advanced (FS568)

(previously Food Science 3 & 4)

  • Investigate how to prepare fruits and vegetables so they taste and look appealing in color and texture
  • Learn about food scientists
  • Create a new beverage and learn a basic food science skill — crystallization

INTERNATIONAL FOODS

International Foods (FN557)

  • Learn about the heritage of many foods and explore your family’s food heritage.

PRESERVATION

Freezing (FP500)

  • Learn about kitchen and food safety basics
  • Properly freeze fruits, juices, vegetables, meat, fish and poultry
  • Package and freeze your product

Drying (FP501)

  • Learn about kitchen and food safety basics
  • Properly dry fruits, vegetables and herbs
  • Package and store your product

Boiling Water Canning (FP502)

  • Learn about kitchen and food safety basics
  • Learn boiling water canning basics
  • Learn to boiling water can fruit, tomatoes, salsa, jams, jellies, and pickles

Pressure Canning (FP503)

  • Learn about kitchen and food safety basics
  • Learn pressure canning basics
  • Learn to pressure can vegetables, beans, meats including poultry, and fish

BREADS

Learn how and why quick bread recipes are so tasty. See what makes a wheat kernel tick and learn how the quick bread ingredients react with one another. You will also explore careers in the kitchen and learn how to alter a recipe for more healthful benefits.

Breads (FN581)

  • Learn about grains
  • Learn to make pancakes, muffins, and sweet breads
  • Learn to make gluten-free baked items
  • Learn about careers in the kitchen

HEALTH/FITNESS (HF)

health fitness
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First Aid (HF771)

  • Learn about first aid for cuts, choking, sprains, strains and bruises
  • Learn about first aid for nosebleeds, stings, bites, poisons, broken bones and burns

Staying Healthy (HF772)

  • Learn about personal hygiene
  • Engage in physical activities and learn about nutrition

Keeping Fit (HF773)

  • If you are already involved in a school or community athletic team, sport of other physical activity program (i.e., basketball, track, swimming, dance) sign up for this project! You will learn more about personal fitness, sports nutrition and safety.

Physical Activity in 4-H Clubs (HF774)

  • Does your club want to start a new physical activity program? Maybe your club group could form a running or volleyball project. Your club might form a line dancing project. The possibilities are endless! Sign up and get moving.

Move Across Missouri (MOVE) (HF775)

• Wouldn’t it be great if you could get credit for all the activity in your life? Now you can!

• Whether you’re into weightlifting, hunting, dancing, soccer, rock climbing or even throwing darts, you can enjoy tracking minutes and earning points while you move! Awards and prizes are included.

• To learn more and get started, visit http://4h.missouri.edu

Bowling (HF711)

  • Learn terminology and etiquette
  • Learn bowling techniques and how to score

Golf (HF712)

  • Learn terminology and etiquette
  • Learn golf swings and shots

Square Dancing (HF713)

Learn about:

  • New Country Dance and square dance moves
  • Calling and choreographing dances
  • Making square dance apparel
  • The history and health benefits of dance

Contact your local Extension office to find out if this is offered in your area.

BICYCLE

Learn about safe cycling, how to repair and maintain a bicycle, plan and participate in cycling activities and events, and have fun!

Bicycle 1 (BY731)

  • Learn about cycling safety and bicycle parts
  • Learn about bicycle riding and areas to ride

Bicycle 2 (BY732)

  • Learn about buying, maintaining and repairing bicycles
  • Learn about bicycling road skills

SELF-DETERMINED (SD)

self determined
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A self-determined project allows members freedom to design a project that is not currently offered. See pg. 16 for more details.

Self-determined (Healthy Living) (SD951)

  • Foods and Nutrition
  • Health
  • Personal Safety

 

 

 

 

 

Shooting Sports

ARCHERY | AIR PISTOL | AIR RIFLE | HUNTING & OUTDOOR SKILLS | MUZZLELOADING | SAFETY SHOTGUN | SMALL BORE PISTOL | SMALL BORE RIFLE | WESTERN HERITAGE & COWBOY SHOOTING

 

SHOOTING SPORTS (SS)

shooting sports
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Breaking clays, punching paper, busting caps, flinging arrows and counting X’s are all part of the 4-H Shooting Sports project. Safety first — but lots of fun! The Shooting Sports project includes many options for 4-H members. You will learn safe gun handling skills and sound fundamentals of shooting under the guidance of caring and knowledgeable adult volunteers.

4-H Shooting Sports is a unique 4-H project in that there are social issues and concerns with the Shooting Sports project that other projects do not deal with. Because of this uniqueness, Missouri 4-H has developed some special guidelines and policies for the Shooting Sports projects. 4-H members, parents and leaders are responsible to understand and follow these policies.

LEADER INFORMATION

A 4-H member may only be enrolled in a 4-H Shooting Sports project if it is led by a certified 4-H Shooting Sports volunteer. There is NO exception to this policy for a parent working with his or her own child. Only a certified 4-H Shooting Sports volunteer may lead any 4-H member in a 4-H Shooting Sports project.

4-H Leader Certification Workshops are conducted twice annually by a team of state 4-H instructors, usually a weekend in Spring and a weekend in Fall. Contact your 4-H staff about these leader workshops. Leader materials are distributed only at the leader workshops.

PROJECT COMPLETION HOURS

Each shooting sports discipline/project number requires a minimum of 10 hours of instruction and/or practice under the direction of a 4-H certified leader.

Please note that these are stand-alone disciplines, and most Shooting Sports projects are open to participants age 8 and older unless otherwise noted in the description.

Ages for the Shooting Sports project are based on 4-H age (age on Dec. 31 of the current program year).

Shooting Sports Safety (SS740)

  • Required for all first year members in a shooting sports project.
  • Strongly recommended that second year members repeat the project.
  • This project does not count against your project limitation.

Archery (SS741)

  • Learn how to tune out all distractions, while shooting either a compound or recurve bow; by focusing on form and release, for either traditional or Olympic style shooting, to build self-esteem in a fun and rewarding way.

Air Rifle (BB and/or Pellet) (SS742)

  • Experience the Standard Air Rifle along with the Aperture Air Rifle while learning about target diversity in a standing, prone and kneeling position 10 meters (33 feet) from the target.

Smallbore Rifle (.22 cal.) (SS743)

  • Learn about breathing techniques, sight picture and sight alignment, along with trigger control; while building a comfortable and stable standing, kneeling, sitting and prone position.

Air Pistol (SS744)

  • Beginning from a seated and supported position, youth will progress to a two-handed standing position and finally to a one-handed International style shooting position.

Shotgun (SS745)

  • Learn about teamwork while busting clays in trap, skeet and sporting clays.
  • Age requirements: 11 years of age and older

Smallbore Pistol (SS747)

  • Learn basic shooting skills and utilize them in hunting small game; or for competition on paper to steel targets ranging from 25 to 100 yards.

    Prerequisites:

    • 14 years and older
    • Previously completed 10 hours of instruction and practice of SS744 Air Pistol project or youth at least 16 years old can still participate without taking SS744 if they pass a competency test, written test and skill demonstration administered by a certified pistol instructor
    • Written parental permission

Muzzleloading (SS748)

  • Experience how to properly load and fire a black powder firearm when aiming at a variety of target types.

    Prerequisites:

    • 11 years of age and older
    • Recommend at least one year participation in SS742 Air Rifle, or 743 Smallbore Rifle.

Hunting and Outdoor Skills (SS749)

  • This project has no association with the Missouri Department of Conservation Hunter Education class. It is a 4-H project designed for those members interested in hunting, game or nongame wildlife, observation and concealment skills, the relationship of people and wildlife, and other hunting and wildlife related subjects.

Leaders: In order to offer this program, volunteer leaders must be trained and certified by 4-H. The Hunting & Outdoor skills training and certification workshop is conducted separately from the regular workshop and is offered only once a year.

Western Heritage and Cowboy Shooting (SS750) Leaders: In order to offer this program, volunteer leaders must be trained and certified by 4-H. The western heritage training and certification workshop is conducted separately from the regular workshop and is offered only once a year.

Check with your local MU Extension center to see if it is offered in your county — only enroll if your county is approved. This project is not eligible for self- determination.

Purpose: To provide an avenue for 4-H members to experience the lifestyles and cultures of the Old West through a living history approach to learning.

Further description, resources and curriculum are found here.

Missouri 4-H has learning opportunities to meet the needs and interests of almost any youth group.

Missouri 4-H programs are educational, fun, action-oriented and provide a variety of experiences that can be adapted for different settings. Typical 4-H settings include school classrooms, after-school programs, clubs and camps. The following learning opportunities are specifically designed for groups.

Leader resources: Each of these opportunities is found as a project on our website. You will find the resources you need there.

 

 

GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Healthy Living
IN SECTION: GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
EATING FROM THE GARDEN | HEALTHY LIFESTYLES | PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES MOVE ACROSS MISSOURI | RECREATION & LEISURE | TEEN COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Physical Activity in 4-H Clubs (HF774)

Does your club want to start a new physical activity program? Maybe your group could form a volleyball, running or line dancing project. The possibilities are endless! Sign up and get moving.

Healthy Lifestyles (LO33)

As the saying goes, "When you have your health, you have everything!" Health is the fourth "H" on the 4-H logo and a common topic for young people today.

Nutrition, physical fitness and emotional well-being are just some of the health issues that contribute to healthy lifestyles for all individuals. The following resources provide fun activities that promote health for young people — helping them learn about healthy lifestyles, learn about themselves and have fun!

The Couch Potato Challenge

The goal of this resource is to provide information about physical fitness and hands-on fitness activities. Promote physical fitness by including these simple and easy-to-use activities in club meetings, camps, school programs or any other setting that includes young people. Help them take the Couch Potato Challenge and engage in more physical activity!

The Dating Mystery…and All That Relationship Stu‡

Help young people explore healthy relationships and positive ways to get along with others. This resource uses popular movies to help young people discover and discuss confusing relationship issues. This activity is designed for young people ages 13 and older.

Steppin’ Out: Fitness Walking

Walking offers a simple yet healthful approach to physical activity — one that almost anyone can achieve. Help young people practice healthy behaviors by walking, solo or with a group. This resource provides walking information and activities designed to inspire healthy behavior!

Recreation and Leisure (LO44)

Every club meeting should include games, songs and other activities in drama, music or sports.

4-H Move Across Missouri (MOVE) (LO775)

Move Across Missouri promotes physical activity. MOVE encourages young people to engage in physical activities they enjoy from a broad range of possibilities such as, walking, biking, running, swimming, dance, taekwondo, gardening and more. Young people and their families can "log" the number of miles they accumulate throughout the year and during the competitive component of the MOVE program. 4-H members can enroll in MOVE as individuals or as a part of a team. A team may consist of a family or members of a 4-H club or group. MOVE awards are provided.

Eating from the Garden (LO972)

Eating from the Garden is a nutrition and gardening curriculum for fourth- and fifth-grade students. Research-based information guides students through nutrition and gardening activities that increase consumption of fruits and vegetables, healthier food choices, gardening knowledge and physical activity.

Eating from the Garden can be used in a group setting, such as a school classroom, after-school program or community center program. It includes a variety of fun nutrition and gardening activities. Each lesson plan has measurable learning objectives and a set of core educational activities. Additional activities are included if you have more time to teach nutrition or gardening in your setting. Each lesson includes a newsletter for students to take home. Lessons have been cross-referenced with the Missouri Learning Standards.

Eating from the Garden is designed to be taught biweekly in the spring and fall, and monthly during the winter months. Lessons are based on a one-hour class with additional activities for longer time periods. Alternating nutrition and gardening lessons allow more time for fruit and vegetable preparations and additional activities in the garden. To match school schedules, one garden is planted in the fall and one in the sp

 

 

 

 

GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Civic Engagement
IN SECTION: GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
CAREER EXPLORATIONS | CIVIC ENGAGEMENT | ENTREPRENUERSHIP | GLOBAL EDUCATION SERVICE LEARNING | SHOW ME CHARACTER | YOUTH-ADULT PARTNERSHIPS | YOUTH PREPAREDNESS

Career Explorations (LO400)

A fulfilling career awaits you. Learn how to prepare for a job path that interests you. Decide what kinds of work are a good match for your talents and abilities. Discover choices for education and training after high school, and what they cost. Investigate salaries, benefits, and careers in demand. Create a career portfolio and learn how job shadowing and volunteer work can take you on the path to your chosen career. For ages 14-19.

Civic Engagement (LO211)

(previously Public Adventures)

Ready for a public adventure? Investigate community issues. Explore jobs of governing officials. See how local decisions get made and problems solved. Plan and take action on an issue or topic of your interest. Develop skills to use your voice, contribute, collaborate, and engage with others in problem-solving. Experience being an active citizen in your community and world!

Entrepreneurship (LO441)

Form or join up with a team of business-minded young people to sell a product, market a service, start a social venture, run a fundraising campaign or other group venture. Explore how entrepreneurs identify good ideas, test their market, and get them off the ground. Build business skills to work together effectively as a team. Investigate options, find a bright idea, make a plan, and go for it!

4-H Global Education (LO36)

Do you ever wonder what kids from other cultures do for fun? What do they eat? What language do they speak? In this project you will have the opportunity to learn about other cultures, similarities and differences among families around the world. It will also prepare you for a possible exchange experience in the future.

See page 54 for additional opportunities.

Service-Learning (LO12)

Give back! Show generosity and good citizenship by strengthening your community through service. Learn how to plan and carry out a group service project. Think critically about an issue that affects your community or world, and what you can do to help. Set learning objectives for your service. Plan and lead others in volunteerism. Reflect on your actions and the meaning of service.

Show Me Character (LO13)

Character is the boss! Explore why being a person of integrity is essential to your success in all forms of relationships and life. Learn positive character traits such as trustworthiness, fairness, respect, caring, responsibility and citizenship, and how they affect where you go and how far you go in life. This group project is based on CHARACTER COUNTS!™ from the Josephson Institute on Ethics.

Youth-Adult Partnerships (LO215)

Grab a partner! Youth and adults come together to share leadership for a collective effort. Plan, implement, and evaluate a 4-H trip, camp, program, or special event. Partner up to provide input and guidance to 4-H councils or programs. Discover and appreciate the strengths of others, work in diverse groups, build teamwork across generations, and learn how to get things done together.

YOUTH PREPAREDNESS (LO212)

Missouri 4-H Ready in the Middle was developed for 11 and 12-year-olds but can also be a great introduction for teens to complete MyPI Missouri. RITM is not a pre-requisite to begin a MyPI Missouri but it does set the stage well for the more comprehensive and engaging MyPI. Ready in the Middle seeks to: a.) engage the entire household, b.) identify and mitigate risks and hazards in and around the house, and c.) provide solutions to enhance safety and preparedness. There is an added focus on emergency equipment and local emergency contact information, as well as family preparedness planning that includes escape plans, communication plans, insurance, and first aid kits. RITM is offered in counties that have certified RITM instructors.

MyPI Missouri prepares 4-H teens ages 13-19 with life-saving skills for community emergency and disaster response. If you want to know what to do when the unexpected happens, MyPI gives you the skills and training to be ready. Teens learn valuable leadership and teamwork skills to assist families, neighborhoods and communities in times of disaster or emergency. MyPI involves CERT (Community Emergency Response Teams) core training, CPR and AED certification and a service project to assist seven families with their disaster kits/communication plans. MyPI is offered in counties that have certified MyPI instructors. (For more information see http://mypimissouri.org)

 

 

 

GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

AG & Stem
IN SECTION: GROUP LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

4-H MILLION TREES | COMMUNITY MAPPING | EMBRYOLOGY | GARDEN ‘N GROW

Embryology, Grades 2–5 (LO15)

This curriculum brings action and experience to the classroom, using a still-air incubator. Students observe the development of the chick in the egg, hatching and post-hatch care.

Show-Me Standards Goals 1, 3; Content — Science; 3, 4, 7.

Embryology, Grades 6–8 (LO16)

This curriculum provides you with background information and exciting experiential life science activities for use in your classroom. Each activity is grade-level appropriate and has been correlated to National Science Education Standards.

Show-Me Standards Goals 1, 3; Content — Science; 3, 4, 7.

Community Mapping (LO17)

Community Mapping is a service-learning activity involving young people, citizens, community professionals and community decision-makers who work together to learn and use geospatial tools and data to address community and environmental issues. Geospatial tools are Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing. The community mapping process can be used for a wide range of service-learning projects.

4-H Million Tree Project (LO931)

Participate in the 4-H Million Tree Project, an ambitious project conceived after a 4-H member decided to do something to combat global climate change. Here is a 4-H service project that improves the quality of our environment!

The Vision: One million new trees planted by 4-H members across the United States and Canada, which will bring many benefits.

Any 4-H member or group can participate, but should o’cially sign up and report your tree plantings.

Visit the national 4-H Million Tree Project at http://4hmilliontrees.org to sign up.

Garden ’n Grow (LO971)

The University of Missouri Extension’s Garden ’n Grow Program is a volunteer gardening program designed to educate young people about horticulture. Young people ages 9-13 will learn not only about gardening, but also science, math, social studies, language arts and have fun while learning! Each participant will plant and harvest his or her vegetables for home use and donation to the local food bank. The goals of this program are to teach young gardeners the pleasures of being outdoors and instill in them the importance of helping others. Garden ‘n Grow participants will develop a sense of self, usefulness and responsibility as they successfully contribute to society.

For more information, contact David Trinklein, University of Missouri Division of Plant Sciences, at 573-882-7511 or trinkleind@missouri.edu, or go to http://plantsci.missouri.edu.

 

 

College Scholarships: Connecting youth to higher education is a fundamental role of the 4-H program. With tremendous support from our donors and partners across the state, the Missouri 4-H Foundation offers more than 60 college scholarships to young people of all backgrounds. Scholarship applications are available on our website, https://extension2.missouri.edu/programs/missouri-4-h-foundation/scholarships. Applications are accepted between January 1 and March 1, 2021.

Securing the Future of 4-H with Endowments: The Missouri 4-H Foundation offers donors gift options designed to sustain Missouri 4-H youth development programs at both county and state levels. Endowments for county or state programs provide a dependable and perpetual source of funding that, when combined with other public and private annual support, assures that 4-H learning opportunities will always be available for Missouri’s youth. For more information about supporting or establishing a county endowment, contact Missouri 4-H Foundation Director Rachel Augustine at augustinere@missouri.edu or 573-884-7641.

Recognizing 4-H Volunteers: The Missouri 4-H Foundation recognizes the work of Missouri 4-H partners and volunteers through annual recognition and awards programs. To learn more, visit https://extension2.missouri.edu/programs/missouri-4-h-foundation/volunteer-recognition.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Alumni, friends and 4-H families can demonstrate their commitment to Missouri 4-H by supporting the Clover Fund. Visit 4h.missouri.edu/foundation to donate.

Contact us by phone at 1-800-642-8041, by email at 4hfoundation@missouri.edu, or on the web at 4h.missouri.edu/foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missouri 4-H Recogniton & Awards

 

Recognition is available to 4-H members at all levels of involvement from project groups to our highest award, the Key Award. Recognition can occur during project meetings when a member is asked to demonstrate a skill they have mastered. It also occurs when older 4-H members compete for the chance to attend National 4-H Congress or National 4-H Conference.

Note: The only areas of the recognition model that are appropriate for Clover Kids are participation and cooperation. It is appropriate to start helping them understand or think about standards of excellence, but their performance should not be evaluated in relation to the standards. Recognition is important for Clover Kids, but it should be positive and non-competitive.

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PARTICIPATION

Essential elements: Belonging and independence

A first step in building self-confidence is to acknowledge 4-H members for their involvement in educational experiences. Clubs, groups and counties are encouraged to recognize participation by 4-H members and volunteers. Creative ideas for recognizing Clover Kids, new members and new families help welcome them into the 4-H program and create a sense of belonging and community.

Participation samples:

  • Clover Kid membership card and pin
  • 4-H membership card
  • 4-H year completion
  • Award certificates
  • 4-H leadership completion certificates
  • 4-H Charter (mandatory for all 4-H Clubs)

STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE

Essential elements: Mastery and independence

Recognition of achievement for standards of excellence gives young people an external, predetermined target for their learning experience. Members may elect to have 4-H projects or their performance evaluated at a local or county 4-H show, fair or other exhibit opportunity.

Mastery is the building of knowledge, skills and attitudes and then demonstrating the competent use of this knowledge and skill. The level of mastery is dependent on the developmental ability of the individual youth. The development of mastery is a process that happens over time and is increased with repetition.

Standards of excellence samples:

  • 4-H club standards of excellence
  • Project work standards of excellence (Blue/Gold, Red/ Silver, White/Bronze recognition)
  • Award certificates

PEER COMPETITION

Essential elements: Mastery and independence

Some 4-H members are encouraged by competition and enjoy the opportunity to compete with peers to determine the best project, performance or achievement. Members should be reminded that in competition there are winners, but there are many more non-winners. Members should be prepared to accept the results of the judge’s decision and are encouraged to appreciate the valuable learning that took place before, during and after the competition.

Peer competition samples:

  • Award certificates
  • State excellence awards (Missouri Recognition Forms)
  • State 4-H Council
  • National 4-H Congress
  • National 4-H Conference
  • MFA Saddle Award
  • Tennessee Walking Horse Award

PROGRESS TOWARD PERSONAL GOALS

Essential elements: Independence, belonging and mastery

Progress toward personal goals enables young people to gain experience in goal-setting and realistic self-assessment as they plan their projects, set their goals and reflect on their experience.

Progress toward personal goals samples:

  • Project records
  • Key Award
  • Award certificates
  • Missouri Recognition Forms

COOPERATION

Essential elements: Belonging and generosity

Recognition for cooperation helps young people learn and work with others — preparing them for living in today’s interdependent, global society. Missouri 4-H creates environments where young people are valued, contributing members of their community. Focusing on young people helps communities recognize that young people are a valuable resource for the betterment of their community.

Cooperation samples:

  • Missouri 4-H Foundation Community Service Grant
  • Kids Helping Kids and 4-H’ers Helping 4-H’ers
  • Building Our American Communities (BOAC) Grants

Note: The only areas of the recognition model that are appropriate for Clover Kids are participation and cooperation. It is appropriate to start helping them understand or think about standards of excellence, but their performance should not be evaluated in relation to the standards. Recognition is important for Clover Kids, but it should be positive and noncompetitive.

Completing a Year of 4-H Membership

4-H club members are recognized for setting and completing goals each year. At a minimum, a 4-H member should:

  • Attend a majority of club or group meetings.
  • Enroll in at least one project and finish it. This includes attending a majority of project meetings, working on project goals and keeping records on the project.
  • Demonstrate a skill learned or knowledge gained by making a handmade item, exhibiting a project or project animal at a show or fair, or presenting a speech, report or demonstration in a group setting such as a club or project meeting.

When a 4-H club member meets these requirements, they are recognized for "completing a year of 4-H membership." Most county 4-H programs award a yearly membership pin to all 4-H Club Members who "complete the year." County 4-H councils may establish additional standards for 4-H clubs within a county. In all cases, these requirements must provide equal access for all young people and must not create barriers to participation.

In the event that a member cannot meet the minimum requirements due to college enrollment, family situation, employment or other factors, the club leader might agree with the member to create options for completion. When possible, this agreement should be planned in advance by the volunteer club leader and the member. County 4-H staff must agree to the terms of the Y639, Individual 4-H Member Comprehensive Plan (fillable PDF), and it must be kept on file at the local extension center. For a copy of the plan, go online here.

STATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS (MISSOURI RECOGNITION FORMS)

Missouri Recognition Forms Levels 1, 2 and 3 are used as both progress toward personal goals and peer competition.

Level 1 (Junior)

  • 4-H members who are between 8 and 10 years old on Dec. 31 of the program year are eligible to apply.
  • Up to five applications submitted from regional review may be forwarded to the state 4-H office.
  • The five applications will be considered State Winners and will receive a certificate, medal of excellence and a scholarship up to $50 toward a camp experience.

Level 2 (Intermediate)

  • 4-H members between 11 and 13 years old on Dec. 31 of the program year are eligible to apply.
  • Up to three applications submitted from regional review may be forwarded to the state 4-H o’ce by Dec. 15.
  • Applicants will be considered State Winners and will receive a scholarship to attend State 4-H Teen Conference, or if aged out, the scholarship will be applied to State 4-H Congress.

Level 3 (Senior)

4-H members who are between 14 and 18 years old on Dec. 31 of the program year are eligible to apply. 4-H members who submit their applications in the fall the year they turn 19 may have their applications considered at regional and state review the following year.

Level 3 forms are used as part of the selection process for National 4-H Congress and National 4-H Conference—please see the website for details on the application processes.

National 4-H Congress

Delegates participate in a wide range of educational workshops and hear from speakers such as the current Miss America. They also participate in a morning of service around Atlanta where they work in classrooms, clean up parks, prepare meals for homeless and shut-ins and much more. Delegates also have the opportunity to tour some of Atlanta’s landmarks such as Coca-Cola, the Martin Luther King Jr. visitor center and others.

National 4-H Conference

The purpose of National 4-H Conference is to:

  • Engage 4-H Youth in personal development experiences that will increase knowledge, resources and skills;
  • Present a youth voice to a partnering federal agency about specific issues affecting youth and communities nationwide; and
  • Empower and mobilize 4-H youth to create positive social change in their communities in a meaningful and genuine way.

 

 

 

4-H Project Record

 

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University of Missouri 4-H Center for Youth Development

Download this form here.

Please complete both sides of this form for each project at the completion of the project year. Use with all projects including animal projects.

A story is to be submitted with the 4-H Project Record. (A one-page story, accompanied by two pages of pictures, may help in describing your project.) If forms Y2000, Y2100 or Y2200 are submitted, a story is not necessary.

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Goal Setting

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Learning and Leadership Experiences

List your learning and leadership experiences in the project area and tell what you have learned. Designate level of participation with the appropriate letter: Local or club (L), County (C), Regional (R), State (S)

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University of Missouri Extension

Knowledge and Skills

What specific knowledge and skills did you learn in your project? Include what you have learned from mistakes. How can you apply what you have learned to your life?

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Information About Project or Animals

List items made or animals used in this project.

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Financial Summary

Costs involved with your project work should be included here. Include expenses such as fabrics, materials, supplies, feed and breeding fees. Also include incomes from sale of items or animals.

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Approval of This Report

This is to verify that this report is the work of the member and is believed to be correct and accurate.

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▪ Issued in furtherance of the Cooperative Extension Work Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Director, Cooperative Extension, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 ▪ an equal opportunity/ADA institution ▪ 573-882-7216 ▪ extension.missouri.edu

Y620

Revised 4/13/Web

 

 

    • "I like 4-H Clover Kids cause I get to make fun stuff. I learned that spiders aren't bugs (insects) — they got too many legs." — Clover Kid member, Bollinger County
4-H Clover kids logoFour happy kids lying on the grass.

Clover Kids is the officially recognized 4-H program in Missouri for children under age 8. The program is designed to provide 5 to 7 year-olds a variety of activities led by an adult that will help them:

  • explore many different interests,
  • build self-confidence,
  • practice communication skills,
  • get along and share with others, and
  • be a part of a group.

 

  • Show/Hide

    What do Clover Kids do?

    Clover Kids attend meetings that center around fun learning activities. Some examples include: pets, food/nutrition, science/space, puppets, music, magic, plants, arts and crafts and much more!

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    Can parents or guardians be involved?

    Yes, parents and guardians can volunteer! Whether it’s making food for a meeting, driving members to activities or becoming a Clover Kids leader, there is always room for parents and guardians to become involved. Contact your county MU Extension center for more information about the Clover Kids program. A 4-H staff member will guide you to the Clover Kids opportunities in your area.

  • Show/Hide

    Does it cost anything to join 4-H Clover Kids?

    There is a small fee to join 4-H Clover Kids. Check with your county MU Extension center for details. In addition, there might be charges for materials or special trips.

CLOVER KIDS RESOURCES

Clover Kids membership pin order form

 

Fair Livestock Display to download for fair display

Project Selection

Project Selection Guide- Full Color

Selecting 4-H Projects Video

Record Keeping

Forms

2019-20 Beginner Project Attendance Form

2019-20 Junior Project Attendance Form

2019-20 Senior Project Attendance Form

Score Sheets

K-State Judging Sheets-All Dept

Department H  Fair Information

Includes  reading, photography, woodworking,  rockets, shooting  sports, banners, citizenship, posters and more

4-H Project Resource Videos

Animal Science Spark Activities

Catching a Bee Swarm

Communication and Expressive Arts Spark Activities

Basic Photography

Upcycled Puppets

Plant Science Spark Activities

Know and Show Plant Hat

Plant People

Seed Germination

Plant Parts We Eat 

 Environmental Science - Spark Activities

Vermicomposting 

Livestock Forage and Seed Growing Science!

Healthy Lifestyles - Spark Activities

Handwashing

Cooking in the Kitchen: Episode 1
Ice Cream Muffins & Omelets

Mindfulness

Healthy Snacks