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Atchison County

Districting

Successful Extension Education Delivery Model Considered Locally Atchison and Leavenworth County Extension Councils plan to join 44 counties across the state who have formed extension districts. There are currently sixteen Kansas Extension Districts. Local discussions in regard to districting have been ongoing between the two counties since the fall of 2013. Local extension council members have developed a QUESTION AND ANSWER FACT SHEET to provide districting details to local citizens. Community members are also encouraged to contact Atchison County Extension Board Chair, Larry Linter, or Leavenworth County Extension Board Chair, Carrie Coffin, if they have additional questions. They may also visit their local county extension office for a printed copy of the fact sheet.

The districting model continues the strong tradition of grass root involvement of local citizens. A century ago, local farm bureaus were organized to support efforts to apply University information at the local level. Today Extension continues this tradition by helping find solutions facing Kansans - Global Food Systems (Feeding the World), Health, Developing Tomorrow’s Leaders, Community Vitality, and Water.

Additional information about Kansas Extension Districts is located on the K-State Research and Extension web page. Click here to see current success stories in Kansas extension districts.

The Kansas Extension District Law, passed in 1991, gave local Extension Councils the opportunity to partner with one or more counties to form a district. Forming a district involves agreements between the local Extension Councils and county commissioners. The first extension district formed was named Post Rock Extension District #1 (Lincoln, Mitchell) and was created on July 1, 1994. Post Rock expanded to include Jewell and Osborne July 1, 2005 and Smith July 1, 2012.

Districting allows local citizens access to the expertise of additional agents. As part of a district team, agents can dedicate more time to a specific area of program focus. At the same time, agents have access to more resources and support as they work together in a larger team. A map of current Extension Districts can be viewed here.